Presentation Title

Please, Give Me Something To Believe!

Moderator

Dr. Andrei Orlov

Location

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

Start Date

28-5-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

28-5-2015 11:00 AM

Abstract

This research includes religion and cults/conspiracy theory within the same realm of belief. The goal behind this research was to ask questions regarding religion and cult/conspiracy belief; and to try to analyze the reason behind the strong belief in a higher power and whether there was a clear distinction between the realms. (If you can believe in one sect strongly enough, can you also believe in the others to the same degree)? This has been done by finding both psychological writings, such as the study written by Alfred DeMaris, Professor of Sociology at Bowling Green State and Chris Bader, Professor of Sociology at Chapman University called “A Test of Stark-Bainbridge Theory of Affiliation with Religious Cults and Sects”. The research also includes studies on the religious side, and the side of conspiracy theory affiliation. Upon examining prior research for religion, cult, and conspiracy belief, it becomes clear that each faction is as strong as the one before it—depending on a person’s psychological/social state at the time of submission. Through showing the reasons people believe in a higher power (what or whomever that may be), this research highlights the importance of the emotional state of a person who believes in either one of the sects. (It also highlights the trouble with measuring affiliation due to the lack of coherence of the terminology).

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 28th, 10:00 AM May 28th, 11:00 AM

Please, Give Me Something To Believe!

University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

This research includes religion and cults/conspiracy theory within the same realm of belief. The goal behind this research was to ask questions regarding religion and cult/conspiracy belief; and to try to analyze the reason behind the strong belief in a higher power and whether there was a clear distinction between the realms. (If you can believe in one sect strongly enough, can you also believe in the others to the same degree)? This has been done by finding both psychological writings, such as the study written by Alfred DeMaris, Professor of Sociology at Bowling Green State and Chris Bader, Professor of Sociology at Chapman University called “A Test of Stark-Bainbridge Theory of Affiliation with Religious Cults and Sects”. The research also includes studies on the religious side, and the side of conspiracy theory affiliation. Upon examining prior research for religion, cult, and conspiracy belief, it becomes clear that each faction is as strong as the one before it—depending on a person’s psychological/social state at the time of submission. Through showing the reasons people believe in a higher power (what or whomever that may be), this research highlights the importance of the emotional state of a person who believes in either one of the sects. (It also highlights the trouble with measuring affiliation due to the lack of coherence of the terminology).