Event Title

Combining English Education with Outdoor Education

Mentor 1

Conan Kmiecik

Location

Union 280

Start Date

24-4-2015 9:40 AM

Description

This research investigation was a result of interest in combining English as a second language (ESL) instruction with outdoor education. The purpose of this exploration was to determine in what ways an outdoor-focused English activity could benefit ESL learners. The focus for the outdoor education component was the hobby letterboxing, a popular pastime—which many enthusiasts enjoy across the country—that combines exploration, problem solving and art in a treasure-hunt activity. The English component involves students creating clues for classmates, reading and comprehending the clues, and completing explicit language activities. The investigation has been theoretical, based on my major field of study, TESOL, as well as my experiences in my minor field of study, Outdoor Education, and experiences working with ESL learners. In theory, an outdoor activity such as letterboxing breaks up the routine of the ESL classroom, lowering students affective filter and allowing organic, spontaneous production of English. In addition, this activity provides students with an opportunity to explore the terrain and ecology of the target language environment resulting in schema development.​

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Apr 24th, 9:40 AM

Combining English Education with Outdoor Education

Union 280

This research investigation was a result of interest in combining English as a second language (ESL) instruction with outdoor education. The purpose of this exploration was to determine in what ways an outdoor-focused English activity could benefit ESL learners. The focus for the outdoor education component was the hobby letterboxing, a popular pastime—which many enthusiasts enjoy across the country—that combines exploration, problem solving and art in a treasure-hunt activity. The English component involves students creating clues for classmates, reading and comprehending the clues, and completing explicit language activities. The investigation has been theoretical, based on my major field of study, TESOL, as well as my experiences in my minor field of study, Outdoor Education, and experiences working with ESL learners. In theory, an outdoor activity such as letterboxing breaks up the routine of the ESL classroom, lowering students affective filter and allowing organic, spontaneous production of English. In addition, this activity provides students with an opportunity to explore the terrain and ecology of the target language environment resulting in schema development.​