Event Title

EXCEPT AS PUNISHMENT FOR A CRIME: THE BELEAGUERD HISTORY OF THE 13TH AMENDMENT.

Mentor 1

Dr. Robert Smith

Location

Union 240A

Start Date

24-4-2015 1:00 PM

Description

My research examines the historic interpretation of the 13th Amendment. The 13th is known as the emancipation amendment, which ended legal slavery in the United States. The second portion of the Amendment has the controversial verbiage “Except As Punishment For A Crime”. Which duly notes the ending of slavery, but states that anyone convicted of a crime can be held in slavery. This clause is a part of our constitution and is legally binding today. The synthesis of the 13th Amendment is important because of the growing minority prison population. My methodology consist of examining 13th Amendment Supreme Court Cases and other case law pertaining to the Amendment. We examine the periodization of oppressive systems like The Black Codes; The Convict Lease System; and The War on Drugs; The role of the Prison Industrial Complex. Drug disparities and perceptions of powder vs. crack cocaine. In addition, we analyze the social ramification of being a felon. My findings suggest there are economic benefits from controlling and restricting African Americans that have been in place since slavery and continue today.

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Apr 24th, 1:00 PM

EXCEPT AS PUNISHMENT FOR A CRIME: THE BELEAGUERD HISTORY OF THE 13TH AMENDMENT.

Union 240A

My research examines the historic interpretation of the 13th Amendment. The 13th is known as the emancipation amendment, which ended legal slavery in the United States. The second portion of the Amendment has the controversial verbiage “Except As Punishment For A Crime”. Which duly notes the ending of slavery, but states that anyone convicted of a crime can be held in slavery. This clause is a part of our constitution and is legally binding today. The synthesis of the 13th Amendment is important because of the growing minority prison population. My methodology consist of examining 13th Amendment Supreme Court Cases and other case law pertaining to the Amendment. We examine the periodization of oppressive systems like The Black Codes; The Convict Lease System; and The War on Drugs; The role of the Prison Industrial Complex. Drug disparities and perceptions of powder vs. crack cocaine. In addition, we analyze the social ramification of being a felon. My findings suggest there are economic benefits from controlling and restricting African Americans that have been in place since slavery and continue today.