Event Title

Relations Between Emotion Regulation and Pubertal Development in Children with Williams Syndrome

Mentor 1

Bonita Klein-Tasman

Location

Union 260

Start Date

24-4-2015 1:00 PM

Description

Introduction: Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by the deletion of 26 genes on Chromosome 7. Distinctive personality characteristics of children with Williams syndrome include high sociability, empathy, and anxiety (Mervis & Klein-Tasman, 2003). Prior research describes a unique set of cognitive and developmental characteristics including high levels of emotional disturbance and precocious pubertal development (Einfeld et al, 2001; Partsch et al., 2002). Difficulties with emotion regulation, defined as the modulation of emotional arousal, have also been associated with social competence problems and impaired academic success (Walden et al., 2003; Graziano et al., 2007). The goal of the current study is to investigate the relations between parent rated emotion regulation and pubertal development in children with Williams syndrome. Methods: Parent perspectives on emotion regulation and pubertal development were collected for 93 children with Williams syndrome (41 male, 52 female), ages 8-15 (M=11.468, SD=2.479). Emotion regulation was measured using the Emotion Regulation Checklist (ERC) and the Emotion Control clinical scale of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Pubertal stage was determined using the Pubertal Development Scale (PDS). Each child was placed into one of five pubertal stage groups: prepubertal, beginning puberty, midpubertal, advanced puberty, and post-pubertal. Development was based on parent reports of menarche, pubic hair growth, and breast development for females, and pubic hair growth, facial hair growth, and voice change for males. The second edition of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT-II) was also used to quantify verbal and nonverbal intelligence. Results: Data analysis has not yet been conducted. Due to expected differences in pubertal development between genders, analysis will take place between and within gender groups. A significant negative correlation between pubertal stage and emotion regulation is expected for both gender groups. No significant difference in emotion regulation between genders is anticipated. Regression analysis will be used to determine if age, gender, and intelligence are predictors of emotion regulation.Discussion: This study will provide information about the relations between emotion regulation and pubertal development in children with Williams syndrome. Understanding this relationship may allow for early prediction of social, cognitive, and behavioral difficulties based on pubertal development and could lead to earlier interventions.

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Apr 24th, 1:00 PM

Relations Between Emotion Regulation and Pubertal Development in Children with Williams Syndrome

Union 260

Introduction: Williams syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by the deletion of 26 genes on Chromosome 7. Distinctive personality characteristics of children with Williams syndrome include high sociability, empathy, and anxiety (Mervis & Klein-Tasman, 2003). Prior research describes a unique set of cognitive and developmental characteristics including high levels of emotional disturbance and precocious pubertal development (Einfeld et al, 2001; Partsch et al., 2002). Difficulties with emotion regulation, defined as the modulation of emotional arousal, have also been associated with social competence problems and impaired academic success (Walden et al., 2003; Graziano et al., 2007). The goal of the current study is to investigate the relations between parent rated emotion regulation and pubertal development in children with Williams syndrome. Methods: Parent perspectives on emotion regulation and pubertal development were collected for 93 children with Williams syndrome (41 male, 52 female), ages 8-15 (M=11.468, SD=2.479). Emotion regulation was measured using the Emotion Regulation Checklist (ERC) and the Emotion Control clinical scale of the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF). Pubertal stage was determined using the Pubertal Development Scale (PDS). Each child was placed into one of five pubertal stage groups: prepubertal, beginning puberty, midpubertal, advanced puberty, and post-pubertal. Development was based on parent reports of menarche, pubic hair growth, and breast development for females, and pubic hair growth, facial hair growth, and voice change for males. The second edition of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test (KBIT-II) was also used to quantify verbal and nonverbal intelligence. Results: Data analysis has not yet been conducted. Due to expected differences in pubertal development between genders, analysis will take place between and within gender groups. A significant negative correlation between pubertal stage and emotion regulation is expected for both gender groups. No significant difference in emotion regulation between genders is anticipated. Regression analysis will be used to determine if age, gender, and intelligence are predictors of emotion regulation.Discussion: This study will provide information about the relations between emotion regulation and pubertal development in children with Williams syndrome. Understanding this relationship may allow for early prediction of social, cognitive, and behavioral difficulties based on pubertal development and could lead to earlier interventions.