Event Title

Effects of the Antimicrobial SK-03-92 on Growth of Yeast Mutants

Mentor 1

Anne Galbraith

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Antibiotic overuse has led to a lack of antibiotics capable of treating some bacterial infections. Mycophyte LLC, a company founded in 2005 by four UW-L faculty members in three different science departments, has developed a library of over 200 compounds based on naturally occurring antimicrobials found in some plant species. Such work has resulted in the development of novel Intellectual Property with several patent applications being filed, including one focused on an antimicrobial named SK-03-92. In order to increase the industry attractiveness and commercialization potential of this novel drug, it is important to elucidate the compound’s mechanism of action (i.e., how it kills). Not for lack of trying, little progress has been made thus far at determining the mechanism of action using bacterial species, mostly because there is no good bacterial model system killed by the drug. Our lab has learned recently that the model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is susceptible to the killing effects of SK-02-92. Therefore in an attempt to elucidate the drug’s mechanism of action, we are now using this well-established genetic model system and examining the effect of the drug on several mutant yeast strains versus wild-type. Results of this work will be presented.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Effects of the Antimicrobial SK-03-92 on Growth of Yeast Mutants

Union Wisconsin Room

Antibiotic overuse has led to a lack of antibiotics capable of treating some bacterial infections. Mycophyte LLC, a company founded in 2005 by four UW-L faculty members in three different science departments, has developed a library of over 200 compounds based on naturally occurring antimicrobials found in some plant species. Such work has resulted in the development of novel Intellectual Property with several patent applications being filed, including one focused on an antimicrobial named SK-03-92. In order to increase the industry attractiveness and commercialization potential of this novel drug, it is important to elucidate the compound’s mechanism of action (i.e., how it kills). Not for lack of trying, little progress has been made thus far at determining the mechanism of action using bacterial species, mostly because there is no good bacterial model system killed by the drug. Our lab has learned recently that the model yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is susceptible to the killing effects of SK-02-92. Therefore in an attempt to elucidate the drug’s mechanism of action, we are now using this well-established genetic model system and examining the effect of the drug on several mutant yeast strains versus wild-type. Results of this work will be presented.