Event Title

Older Adults' Participation in an Intergenerational Reading Program: Benefits and Challenges

Mentor 1

Simone DeVore

Mentor 2

Giuliana Miolo

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Intergenerational programming provides older adults with opportunities to interact with children during planned activities. Studies have shown that older adults who volunteer with children experience positive health and cognitive outcomes. In this study, we evaluated the effects that participating in an intergenerational reading program with young children had on older adults living in a residential community. Three older adults attended a two-day workshop on how to interact with and engage preschool aged children during joint book reading. Following the training, they were invited to read books to young children, who attend an on-campus, early childhood education and care center. Weekly readings took place over a period of six to seven weeks. Prior to each reading session, the student research team met with the older adults to pre-read the selected book and develop questions to ask during the reading sessions. To evaluate the impact of their participation in this program, the older adults were interviewed before and after each reading session about their state of happiness, their perceptions of the reading session, and whether they needed any additional support in their roles as readers. In addition, the older adults were interviewed at the beginning and end of the reading program, the older adults were asked to rate how confident they felt about reading to young children, and about their expected and actual challenges and benefits of participating in the program. The adults reported that participating in this reading program had a positive effect on their happiness, confidence, and overall well-being. Upon completion of the project, it was concluded that older adults participating in intergenerational programming experienced positive health and cognitive outcomes. Results from both qualitative and quantitative analyses will be reported.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Older Adults' Participation in an Intergenerational Reading Program: Benefits and Challenges

Union Wisconsin Room

Intergenerational programming provides older adults with opportunities to interact with children during planned activities. Studies have shown that older adults who volunteer with children experience positive health and cognitive outcomes. In this study, we evaluated the effects that participating in an intergenerational reading program with young children had on older adults living in a residential community. Three older adults attended a two-day workshop on how to interact with and engage preschool aged children during joint book reading. Following the training, they were invited to read books to young children, who attend an on-campus, early childhood education and care center. Weekly readings took place over a period of six to seven weeks. Prior to each reading session, the student research team met with the older adults to pre-read the selected book and develop questions to ask during the reading sessions. To evaluate the impact of their participation in this program, the older adults were interviewed before and after each reading session about their state of happiness, their perceptions of the reading session, and whether they needed any additional support in their roles as readers. In addition, the older adults were interviewed at the beginning and end of the reading program, the older adults were asked to rate how confident they felt about reading to young children, and about their expected and actual challenges and benefits of participating in the program. The adults reported that participating in this reading program had a positive effect on their happiness, confidence, and overall well-being. Upon completion of the project, it was concluded that older adults participating in intergenerational programming experienced positive health and cognitive outcomes. Results from both qualitative and quantitative analyses will be reported.