Event Title

Washington Park Stories

Mentor 1

Arijit Sen

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

In the Spring, 2014 semester upwards of 100 students enrolled in Architecture and Human Behavior collected and expanded on stories from the Washington Park neighborhood of Milwaukee. These stories ranged from telling of the neighborhood’s past and present to demonstrating the potential its spaces hold for revitalization. Following the completion of the semester these stories were compiled into a website that is easily accessed by the public and is intended to be used as a resource for projects in Milwaukee Public Schools classroom settings. Each story collected during the semester was carefully read, revised, and linked with others sharing similar themes. This linking led to the realization that the past, present, and future conditions of the Washington Park neighborhood are very much connected, and a web of ideas expanding across the entire neighborhood was created in the process. The work done by the students of Architecture and Human Behavior highlights the underlying community that reveals itself when looked at in-depth, and it emphasizes that neighborhoods like Washington Park cannot go unnoticed in the grand scheme of things.​

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Washington Park Stories

Union Wisconsin Room

In the Spring, 2014 semester upwards of 100 students enrolled in Architecture and Human Behavior collected and expanded on stories from the Washington Park neighborhood of Milwaukee. These stories ranged from telling of the neighborhood’s past and present to demonstrating the potential its spaces hold for revitalization. Following the completion of the semester these stories were compiled into a website that is easily accessed by the public and is intended to be used as a resource for projects in Milwaukee Public Schools classroom settings. Each story collected during the semester was carefully read, revised, and linked with others sharing similar themes. This linking led to the realization that the past, present, and future conditions of the Washington Park neighborhood are very much connected, and a web of ideas expanding across the entire neighborhood was created in the process. The work done by the students of Architecture and Human Behavior highlights the underlying community that reveals itself when looked at in-depth, and it emphasizes that neighborhoods like Washington Park cannot go unnoticed in the grand scheme of things.​