Event Title

Characterization of Novel pH Sensor

Mentor 1

Woo Jin Jin Chang

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

The quality and status of water can be determined by various factors, such as concentration of minerals, microorganisms, heavy metals, and other chemicals. pH is the representative indicator shows quality of the water because it affects form of chemicals and biomolecules. In this project, we have characterized a solid-state pH sensor that will be used for pH testing of various environments. The novel solid-state pH sensor is prepared by surface modification of commercialized Screen Printed Electrode and treated with iridium oxide that acts as a potentiometer that will read hydrogen levels of various solutions. The prototype testing involved the sensor in conjunction with a simple sensor signaling circuit containing an operational amp for amplification of pH signals that were desired. Our future endeavors and foresight involves fabrication and commercialization of novel low-cost pH sensor, as well as more accurate monitoring of the pH in various water sources, such as Lake Michigan, waste water, and tap water. Especially, we will use developed device for long-term monitoring of pH change in Lake Michigan under the collaboration with researchers in School of Freshwater sciences.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Characterization of Novel pH Sensor

Union Wisconsin Room

The quality and status of water can be determined by various factors, such as concentration of minerals, microorganisms, heavy metals, and other chemicals. pH is the representative indicator shows quality of the water because it affects form of chemicals and biomolecules. In this project, we have characterized a solid-state pH sensor that will be used for pH testing of various environments. The novel solid-state pH sensor is prepared by surface modification of commercialized Screen Printed Electrode and treated with iridium oxide that acts as a potentiometer that will read hydrogen levels of various solutions. The prototype testing involved the sensor in conjunction with a simple sensor signaling circuit containing an operational amp for amplification of pH signals that were desired. Our future endeavors and foresight involves fabrication and commercialization of novel low-cost pH sensor, as well as more accurate monitoring of the pH in various water sources, such as Lake Michigan, waste water, and tap water. Especially, we will use developed device for long-term monitoring of pH change in Lake Michigan under the collaboration with researchers in School of Freshwater sciences.