Event Title

The Effects of Multifocal Lens Glasses on Stair Descent of Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

Mentor 1

Dennis Tomashek

Mentor 2

Roger Smith

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

This pilot study will focus on measureing the effects of multifocal lens (MfL) eyeglasses on gait adn stair performance of those with Parkinson's disease. We will be comparing two groups: those who have Parkinson's disease and wear multifocal lenses and those with Parkinson's disease who do not wear multifocal lenses. Past research has explored the effects of Mfls on novice and experienced MfL users' gait, but has focused on flat surface gait, obstacle avoidance, and one-step up or down. No study of MfL has examined gait while descending a full flight of stairs. Additionally, no studies have been conducted in populations who are predisposed to gair impairments, such as those with development or acquired neurophysiological conditions. This pilot study will set the groundwork for a major study on the effects of Multifocal lens glasses on people with Parkinson's disease. Scientific and anecdotal information indicates a greater relieance on vision for people with Parkinson's disease, yet no formal study has been conducted on the effect of MfLs on this population. Currently, the study is being conducted on normal healthy young adults to test and revise the study protocol. The effects that MfLs have on gait and balance are being evaluated through four vision assessments and three gait assessments as well as a protocol developed for stair descent. The four vision assessments that are being used in our research are as the following: Visual Acuity, Fly Stereo Test, Howard-dohlman Depth Perception Test, and a Contrast Sensitivity test. The three balance assessments being conducted are the Berg Balance Scale, the Dynamic Gait Index, and the Timed up and Go (TUG). We will also try to explore these effects in a small number of participants using the Mobile Eye XG Tracker, which will allow us to see where participants are fixating their vision as they descend the stairs and negotiate obstacles. We expect to find significant results showing that MfLs affect people with Parkinson's disease in much the same way as normal healthy adults. This is a potentially crucial finding for clinicians, opticians, and therapists who work with people with Parkinson's disease as the negative effects may have more serious implications for people already predisposed to gair problems and falling.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

The Effects of Multifocal Lens Glasses on Stair Descent of Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

Union Wisconsin Room

This pilot study will focus on measureing the effects of multifocal lens (MfL) eyeglasses on gait adn stair performance of those with Parkinson's disease. We will be comparing two groups: those who have Parkinson's disease and wear multifocal lenses and those with Parkinson's disease who do not wear multifocal lenses. Past research has explored the effects of Mfls on novice and experienced MfL users' gait, but has focused on flat surface gait, obstacle avoidance, and one-step up or down. No study of MfL has examined gait while descending a full flight of stairs. Additionally, no studies have been conducted in populations who are predisposed to gair impairments, such as those with development or acquired neurophysiological conditions. This pilot study will set the groundwork for a major study on the effects of Multifocal lens glasses on people with Parkinson's disease. Scientific and anecdotal information indicates a greater relieance on vision for people with Parkinson's disease, yet no formal study has been conducted on the effect of MfLs on this population. Currently, the study is being conducted on normal healthy young adults to test and revise the study protocol. The effects that MfLs have on gait and balance are being evaluated through four vision assessments and three gait assessments as well as a protocol developed for stair descent. The four vision assessments that are being used in our research are as the following: Visual Acuity, Fly Stereo Test, Howard-dohlman Depth Perception Test, and a Contrast Sensitivity test. The three balance assessments being conducted are the Berg Balance Scale, the Dynamic Gait Index, and the Timed up and Go (TUG). We will also try to explore these effects in a small number of participants using the Mobile Eye XG Tracker, which will allow us to see where participants are fixating their vision as they descend the stairs and negotiate obstacles. We expect to find significant results showing that MfLs affect people with Parkinson's disease in much the same way as normal healthy adults. This is a potentially crucial finding for clinicians, opticians, and therapists who work with people with Parkinson's disease as the negative effects may have more serious implications for people already predisposed to gair problems and falling.