Event Title

Self-management strategies of HIV-positive Mothers in Kenya: Identifying opportunities for sustained wellbeing of HIV+ mothers and their children

Mentor 1

Dr. Peninnah Kako

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Background: HIV continues to be a major global health problem. Kenya, located in east Africa, is now ranked 4th in the world in HIV burden where women are the most infected. In Kenya, there is an urgent need to gain understanding of how HIV+ mothers care for themselves and their children to identify areas of intervention and programming for long-term HIV-related self-management. Methods: The purpose of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of HIV+ mother’s self-management. The study employed longitudinal qualitative data analysis using narrative inquiry and self-management theory to determine how Kenyan mothers’ self-managed their HIV infection over time. To accomplish the aims of this study, we reviewed the interviews of forty-four HIV+ Kenyan mothers (23 rural and 21 urban) from the longitudinal study titled “HIV Transmission Risk, Access to Treatment, and Self Management of Illness Over Time: An In-Depth Longitudinal Study of HIV-Infected Women in Kenya”(2010). The data was coded and organized into themes from the self-management theory. From the coded data, we identified common HIV-related self-management techniques. Results: Using narrative inquiry to segment women narratives, common themes on self-management process emerged: Having trust in the doctor or health care clinic; having a strong spiritual connection; Using peer group social support; Having familial support for medication adherence, and Seeking financial support using small scale businesses. Conclusions: HIV+ mothers voices can inform HIV-related interventions and programming in resource-limited areas. Engaging women, who are the most affected by HIV in Kenya, is likely to yield gender and culturally sensitive interventions that could be scaled to similar areas in sub-Saharan Africa. Expected Outcomes: From the findings of this study, we expect to develop a manuscript that documents the social-cultural and family processes of HIV-related self-management strategies for HIV+ mothers and their families in Kenya. From this understanding we expect to inform future HIV interventions and policy on self-management strategies that are culturally relevant and gender sensitive for HIV+ mothers in Kenya.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Self-management strategies of HIV-positive Mothers in Kenya: Identifying opportunities for sustained wellbeing of HIV+ mothers and their children

Union Wisconsin Room

Background: HIV continues to be a major global health problem. Kenya, located in east Africa, is now ranked 4th in the world in HIV burden where women are the most infected. In Kenya, there is an urgent need to gain understanding of how HIV+ mothers care for themselves and their children to identify areas of intervention and programming for long-term HIV-related self-management. Methods: The purpose of this study was to develop an in-depth understanding of HIV+ mother’s self-management. The study employed longitudinal qualitative data analysis using narrative inquiry and self-management theory to determine how Kenyan mothers’ self-managed their HIV infection over time. To accomplish the aims of this study, we reviewed the interviews of forty-four HIV+ Kenyan mothers (23 rural and 21 urban) from the longitudinal study titled “HIV Transmission Risk, Access to Treatment, and Self Management of Illness Over Time: An In-Depth Longitudinal Study of HIV-Infected Women in Kenya”(2010). The data was coded and organized into themes from the self-management theory. From the coded data, we identified common HIV-related self-management techniques. Results: Using narrative inquiry to segment women narratives, common themes on self-management process emerged: Having trust in the doctor or health care clinic; having a strong spiritual connection; Using peer group social support; Having familial support for medication adherence, and Seeking financial support using small scale businesses. Conclusions: HIV+ mothers voices can inform HIV-related interventions and programming in resource-limited areas. Engaging women, who are the most affected by HIV in Kenya, is likely to yield gender and culturally sensitive interventions that could be scaled to similar areas in sub-Saharan Africa. Expected Outcomes: From the findings of this study, we expect to develop a manuscript that documents the social-cultural and family processes of HIV-related self-management strategies for HIV+ mothers and their families in Kenya. From this understanding we expect to inform future HIV interventions and policy on self-management strategies that are culturally relevant and gender sensitive for HIV+ mothers in Kenya.