Event Title

Oxygen Use at the End of Life: Attitudes and Beliefs Survey in Wisconsin

Mentor 1

Dr. Quinn-Lee

Mentor 2

Dr. Moch

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Current research on the practice of prescribing oxygen at the end of life points to an uncertainty in whether or not oxygen use at the end of life directly affects the timeline of the dying process. Little information is available as to the benefits of oxygen use over alternative methods to relieve dyspnea at the end of life. The purpose of this research was to understand the use of oxygen at the end of life in contemporary palliative care practice. Twenty-five palliative care directors throughout Wisconsin completed a survey which asked a series of questions about attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding oxygen use at the end of life. A mixed methods approach was utilized. Half of the respondents believe that oxygen correlates to prolonging the dying process. 96% of facilities have a standard “comfort care” protocol or order set for their patients addressing oxygen use. Only two facilities do not administer oxygen at the end of life. An important finding is that addressing quality of life of patients is often the main objective in prescribing oxygen. Emotional comfort of patients (50%) and family (63%), as well as caregiver’s need for tangible evidence that they are assisting the patient were reported as additional reasons for using oxygen at the end of life.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Oxygen Use at the End of Life: Attitudes and Beliefs Survey in Wisconsin

Union Wisconsin Room

Current research on the practice of prescribing oxygen at the end of life points to an uncertainty in whether or not oxygen use at the end of life directly affects the timeline of the dying process. Little information is available as to the benefits of oxygen use over alternative methods to relieve dyspnea at the end of life. The purpose of this research was to understand the use of oxygen at the end of life in contemporary palliative care practice. Twenty-five palliative care directors throughout Wisconsin completed a survey which asked a series of questions about attitudes, beliefs, and practices regarding oxygen use at the end of life. A mixed methods approach was utilized. Half of the respondents believe that oxygen correlates to prolonging the dying process. 96% of facilities have a standard “comfort care” protocol or order set for their patients addressing oxygen use. Only two facilities do not administer oxygen at the end of life. An important finding is that addressing quality of life of patients is often the main objective in prescribing oxygen. Emotional comfort of patients (50%) and family (63%), as well as caregiver’s need for tangible evidence that they are assisting the patient were reported as additional reasons for using oxygen at the end of life.