Event Title

Use of Elementary Cognitive Tasks to Perceive Executive Functioning Ability

Mentor 1

David Osmon

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Elementary cognitive tasks (ECTs) to assess perceptual-motor processes and executive functions (EF) offer several advantages: a precise definition of EF, a clear differentiation between non-EF and EF abilities, levels of complexity according to bits of information, and a mathematical model using a ratio level of measurement among others. This study tested the concurrent validity of four ECTs (0- & 1-bit non-EF tasks and 1-bit & 2-bit EF tasks) by examining their relationship with nine subtests from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System that constitute three EF factors: Switching, Updating, and Inhibition. Tasks were administered to 133 undergraduates (mean=22.08, SD=4.40), and the three EF factors were used to predict performance on the ECTs. For both the 0-bit and 1-bit non-EF tasks, only Switching was predictive (Radj2=.06 & .15, p<.005 & .01, respectively). For the 1-bit EF task, both Updating and Inhibition were predictive, although Updating predominated (Importance=.767 & .233, respectively; Radj2=.16, p<.005 & .01, respectively). Contrarily, for the 2-bit EF task, Inhibition predominated compared to Updating (Importance=.699 & .301, respectively; Radj2= .19, p<.0001 & .02, respectively).​ Results are discussed in terms of Miyake et al.’s (2012) unity/diversity framework of EF as well as other studies using latent variable analysis.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Use of Elementary Cognitive Tasks to Perceive Executive Functioning Ability

Union Wisconsin Room

Elementary cognitive tasks (ECTs) to assess perceptual-motor processes and executive functions (EF) offer several advantages: a precise definition of EF, a clear differentiation between non-EF and EF abilities, levels of complexity according to bits of information, and a mathematical model using a ratio level of measurement among others. This study tested the concurrent validity of four ECTs (0- & 1-bit non-EF tasks and 1-bit & 2-bit EF tasks) by examining their relationship with nine subtests from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System that constitute three EF factors: Switching, Updating, and Inhibition. Tasks were administered to 133 undergraduates (mean=22.08, SD=4.40), and the three EF factors were used to predict performance on the ECTs. For both the 0-bit and 1-bit non-EF tasks, only Switching was predictive (Radj2=.06 & .15, p<.005 & .01, respectively). For the 1-bit EF task, both Updating and Inhibition were predictive, although Updating predominated (Importance=.767 & .233, respectively; Radj2=.16, p<.005 & .01, respectively). Contrarily, for the 2-bit EF task, Inhibition predominated compared to Updating (Importance=.699 & .301, respectively; Radj2= .19, p<.0001 & .02, respectively).​ Results are discussed in terms of Miyake et al.’s (2012) unity/diversity framework of EF as well as other studies using latent variable analysis.