Event Title

Representation + Critical Inquiry: The Language of Architectural Competitions

Mentor 1

Mo Zell

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

It has been said that architects do not build buildings but instead make drawings. In the making of drawings architects craft a narrative about the project. They create representations – ideas, instructions, meanings - to support and align with the narrative. These representations are a reflective an art form; one that continuously questions the architectural work itself. The goal of this research is to create new modes of representation that investigate the critical questions relevant to the discipline of architecture through means of the architectural competition. Examination of representation techniques from contemporary practices of several prominent figures in the architectural field including those of Neil Denari, NADAAA, and Zaha Hadid is an essential component to this research. Typology research and its complementary representational strategies help frame representation inquiries and allow for the development of a representational standard to follow. Critical to this nature of research is putting theory into practice. The architectural competition is often at the cutting edge of design inquiry due to the fact that it remains theoretical. The architectural competition provides an opportunity to ask critical questions without the limitations of budget, politics, and even gravity. The competition also provides opportunities to advance new modes of representation. For example, renowned architect Rem Koolhaus revolutionized architectural diagramming after his entry into the Parc de la Villette competition. During the research cycle, we completed two architectural competitions: 1) Looking Forward: Reimagining the Athenaeum of Philadelphia 2) Chicago Architecture Biennial Lakefront Kiosk Competition. Each competition requires a unique analysis of intended outcomes to determine the appropriate style of graphic representation to apply. Every project’s individual objectives require unique representation style to effectively communicate the narrative of the project. Through this research we are able contribute new modes of representation to the field of architecture.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Representation + Critical Inquiry: The Language of Architectural Competitions

Union Wisconsin Room

It has been said that architects do not build buildings but instead make drawings. In the making of drawings architects craft a narrative about the project. They create representations – ideas, instructions, meanings - to support and align with the narrative. These representations are a reflective an art form; one that continuously questions the architectural work itself. The goal of this research is to create new modes of representation that investigate the critical questions relevant to the discipline of architecture through means of the architectural competition. Examination of representation techniques from contemporary practices of several prominent figures in the architectural field including those of Neil Denari, NADAAA, and Zaha Hadid is an essential component to this research. Typology research and its complementary representational strategies help frame representation inquiries and allow for the development of a representational standard to follow. Critical to this nature of research is putting theory into practice. The architectural competition is often at the cutting edge of design inquiry due to the fact that it remains theoretical. The architectural competition provides an opportunity to ask critical questions without the limitations of budget, politics, and even gravity. The competition also provides opportunities to advance new modes of representation. For example, renowned architect Rem Koolhaus revolutionized architectural diagramming after his entry into the Parc de la Villette competition. During the research cycle, we completed two architectural competitions: 1) Looking Forward: Reimagining the Athenaeum of Philadelphia 2) Chicago Architecture Biennial Lakefront Kiosk Competition. Each competition requires a unique analysis of intended outcomes to determine the appropriate style of graphic representation to apply. Every project’s individual objectives require unique representation style to effectively communicate the narrative of the project. Through this research we are able contribute new modes of representation to the field of architecture.