Event Title

Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for the Assessment of Cerebrovascular Plasticity

Mentor 1

Rodney Swain

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Vascular pathologies represent the leading cause of fatality worldwide, killing 17.5 million people in 2012 and accounting for 3 in every 10 deaths. Hypoxia is a disease state that frequently manifests as a result of these medical conditions, neurologic or otherwise. Underlying mechanisms are common in the neuronal degeneration resulting from acute injury (e.g., stroke, trauma) and during progressive, adult-onset diseases (e.g., ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia). Recent evidence has demonstrated that exercise is a powerful activator of compensatory mechanisms for the lack of oxygen and glucose supply following a significant reduction or cessation of local vascular circulation. Traditional methods of analysis (e.g., histology, immunohistochemistry, etc.) have enabled researchers to successfully examine changes in cerebrovascular architecture in response to exercise; however, these techniques typically require the sacrifice of the animal, which inhibits longitudinal data and prevents translation to human medicine. More advanced techniques, such as functional MRI, have allowed researchers to investigate exercise-induced changes in brain anatomy and function at multiple time points over long periods of time. While these technologies are generally non-invasive, they are prohibitive in terms of cost and image resolution. The present study introduces spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) as a means to fill the respective gaps in both traditional analyses and established brain imaging techniques. SD-OCT produces high resolution, three-dimensional angiograms, and allows for non-invasive imaging within the same animal at multiple time points. This enables us to map the temporal sequence of cerebrovascular growth in addition to real-time changes in blood vessel dilation. Despite advancements in the field, the independent effect of exercise training on cerebrovascular structure and function has not been fully explored. Thus, the primary goal of this study is to examine long-term cerebrovascular changes in the forelimb region of the primary motor cortex of the adult rat in response to voluntary exercise. Using SD-OCT to analyze blood vessel density between exercised and non-exercised animals will allow us to investigate the cerebrovascular system and the effects of exercise with high precision. An additional goal of this study is to examine real- time capillary dilation in response to a laboratory-induced condition of hypoxia (i.e., 10% oxygen). Utilizing SD-OCT to examine changes in blood vessel diameter between exercised and non-exercised animals will allow us to draw conclusions on exercise-induced cerebrovascular plasticity.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography for the Assessment of Cerebrovascular Plasticity

Union Wisconsin Room

Vascular pathologies represent the leading cause of fatality worldwide, killing 17.5 million people in 2012 and accounting for 3 in every 10 deaths. Hypoxia is a disease state that frequently manifests as a result of these medical conditions, neurologic or otherwise. Underlying mechanisms are common in the neuronal degeneration resulting from acute injury (e.g., stroke, trauma) and during progressive, adult-onset diseases (e.g., ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia). Recent evidence has demonstrated that exercise is a powerful activator of compensatory mechanisms for the lack of oxygen and glucose supply following a significant reduction or cessation of local vascular circulation. Traditional methods of analysis (e.g., histology, immunohistochemistry, etc.) have enabled researchers to successfully examine changes in cerebrovascular architecture in response to exercise; however, these techniques typically require the sacrifice of the animal, which inhibits longitudinal data and prevents translation to human medicine. More advanced techniques, such as functional MRI, have allowed researchers to investigate exercise-induced changes in brain anatomy and function at multiple time points over long periods of time. While these technologies are generally non-invasive, they are prohibitive in terms of cost and image resolution. The present study introduces spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) as a means to fill the respective gaps in both traditional analyses and established brain imaging techniques. SD-OCT produces high resolution, three-dimensional angiograms, and allows for non-invasive imaging within the same animal at multiple time points. This enables us to map the temporal sequence of cerebrovascular growth in addition to real-time changes in blood vessel dilation. Despite advancements in the field, the independent effect of exercise training on cerebrovascular structure and function has not been fully explored. Thus, the primary goal of this study is to examine long-term cerebrovascular changes in the forelimb region of the primary motor cortex of the adult rat in response to voluntary exercise. Using SD-OCT to analyze blood vessel density between exercised and non-exercised animals will allow us to investigate the cerebrovascular system and the effects of exercise with high precision. An additional goal of this study is to examine real- time capillary dilation in response to a laboratory-induced condition of hypoxia (i.e., 10% oxygen). Utilizing SD-OCT to examine changes in blood vessel diameter between exercised and non-exercised animals will allow us to draw conclusions on exercise-induced cerebrovascular plasticity.