Event Title

Analysis of Metabolism in Benzodiazepine-like Structured Molecules

Mentor 1

Margaret Guthrie

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

More commonly known under the prescription name as valium, benzodiazepines are a class of psycho-active drugs that have been found to treat a variety of symptoms including anxiety, insomnia, asthma, muscle spasms and seizures, alcohol withdrawal, and as a premedication. Structurally, the fusion of a benzene ring and a diazepine ring contribute to the formation of a benzodiazepine. Variances in formations of the drug can be identified by the side-chains attached to the central structure. The overall orientation of these side-chains in a benzodiazepine structure contribute to the highly selective interactions observed with the GABAₐ neurotransmitter. With consideration of the many pathways that form the many types of benzodiazepines, it is understood that some of the structural interactions with the GABAₐ receptor may yield desirable results, such as anxiolytic and sedative pharmacological properties. The Arnold Group in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at UWM has allocated research towards molecules with structural similarities to benzodiazepines, in hopes of discovering a cheaper, more readily available molecule that can biochemically function like an ordinary benzodiazepine. Currently, active molecules of interest include an Xhe74 Ethyl Ester, an Xhe Carboxylic Acid, an Xhe-III-74 compound, and an HZ-166 complex as the primary standard. Differing amounts of the aforementioned compounds are injected into lab mice, and concentrations of active component are observed in different tissues over several time intervals to identify the metabolic processing of the compound throughout the body. The information provided yields not only hints of the site of biological interaction, but also clues towards the rate and order at which the compound is being metabolized. In conclusion, our current and future research aims to provide further insight to our understanding of different benzodiazepines, and how structural changes to these molecules can impede or enhance a variety of known and unknown biochemical functions within our body. It is of our best interest to continue to identify the unknown possibilities yet to be discovered regarding the structural conformation of these molecules, and to utilize their unique selectivity to develop a novel therapeutic to improve the lives of others.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Analysis of Metabolism in Benzodiazepine-like Structured Molecules

Union Wisconsin Room

More commonly known under the prescription name as valium, benzodiazepines are a class of psycho-active drugs that have been found to treat a variety of symptoms including anxiety, insomnia, asthma, muscle spasms and seizures, alcohol withdrawal, and as a premedication. Structurally, the fusion of a benzene ring and a diazepine ring contribute to the formation of a benzodiazepine. Variances in formations of the drug can be identified by the side-chains attached to the central structure. The overall orientation of these side-chains in a benzodiazepine structure contribute to the highly selective interactions observed with the GABAₐ neurotransmitter. With consideration of the many pathways that form the many types of benzodiazepines, it is understood that some of the structural interactions with the GABAₐ receptor may yield desirable results, such as anxiolytic and sedative pharmacological properties. The Arnold Group in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry at UWM has allocated research towards molecules with structural similarities to benzodiazepines, in hopes of discovering a cheaper, more readily available molecule that can biochemically function like an ordinary benzodiazepine. Currently, active molecules of interest include an Xhe74 Ethyl Ester, an Xhe Carboxylic Acid, an Xhe-III-74 compound, and an HZ-166 complex as the primary standard. Differing amounts of the aforementioned compounds are injected into lab mice, and concentrations of active component are observed in different tissues over several time intervals to identify the metabolic processing of the compound throughout the body. The information provided yields not only hints of the site of biological interaction, but also clues towards the rate and order at which the compound is being metabolized. In conclusion, our current and future research aims to provide further insight to our understanding of different benzodiazepines, and how structural changes to these molecules can impede or enhance a variety of known and unknown biochemical functions within our body. It is of our best interest to continue to identify the unknown possibilities yet to be discovered regarding the structural conformation of these molecules, and to utilize their unique selectivity to develop a novel therapeutic to improve the lives of others.