Event Title

Analysis of Volatile Chemicals in Canine Urine

Mentor 1

Dr. Paul House

Mentor 2

Anneke Lisberg

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

This work attempts to identify volatile substances in dog urine that might affect the behavior of dogs exposed to them. Thirty eight total dog urine samples have been collected from different males. It is hoped that differences in the volatile compounds of the urine samples can be correlated to dog behavior. Since little is known regarding which compounds in urine dogs use to communicate, determining these compounds could give great insight in canine olfactory functions and significance. Previous experiments with mice, rats, hyenas, and lemurs have indicated relatively small (around five to ten carbon chains) ketones and aldehydes as important volatiles in urine. It is hypothesized that these ketones and aldehydes will be found in dog urine as well. In order to determine volatile compounds, the urine samples were tested using solid phase microextraction (SPME). SPME is a separation technique designed to collect volatile compounds on a silica coated fiber, which can be analyzed through gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine identity and abundance of specific compounds. Initial tests were encouraging, but chromatograms show peaks for only a few compounds and their mass spectra have not been assigned. Work continues on creating a more sensitive method for seeing and determining the volatile compounds. However, only four of the thirty eight total dog urine samples have been tested.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Analysis of Volatile Chemicals in Canine Urine

Union Wisconsin Room

This work attempts to identify volatile substances in dog urine that might affect the behavior of dogs exposed to them. Thirty eight total dog urine samples have been collected from different males. It is hoped that differences in the volatile compounds of the urine samples can be correlated to dog behavior. Since little is known regarding which compounds in urine dogs use to communicate, determining these compounds could give great insight in canine olfactory functions and significance. Previous experiments with mice, rats, hyenas, and lemurs have indicated relatively small (around five to ten carbon chains) ketones and aldehydes as important volatiles in urine. It is hypothesized that these ketones and aldehydes will be found in dog urine as well. In order to determine volatile compounds, the urine samples were tested using solid phase microextraction (SPME). SPME is a separation technique designed to collect volatile compounds on a silica coated fiber, which can be analyzed through gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine identity and abundance of specific compounds. Initial tests were encouraging, but chromatograms show peaks for only a few compounds and their mass spectra have not been assigned. Work continues on creating a more sensitive method for seeing and determining the volatile compounds. However, only four of the thirty eight total dog urine samples have been tested.