Event Title

Morphological characterization of exuvia from co-emerging riverine dragonflies using geometric morphometrics

Mentor 1

Jessica

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:45 AM

Description

Among many evolutionary pressures, the physical environment plays a significant role in the refining organism morphology. The purpose of this study is to determine whether geometric morphometrics can be used to differentiate or characterize shape variation among species and sexes of co-emerging riverine dragonflies, including two rare species in New Brunswick, Canada: Ophiogompus howei and Gomphus ventricosus. Exuvia from 26 locations along the St. John and Miramichi Rivers were collected in June 2013. Exuvia were identified to species and landmarks were digitized on digital micrographs of the dorsal and ventral surfaces. A multivariate analysis of variance was used to test for differences in body shape between species and sexes within a species. We expect to find significant levels of variation among species in support of taxonomic diagnosis, but fewer differences between sexes with a species. A detailed analysis of shape will help to confirm the presence of rare and protected species at these sites. Furthermore, this analysis provides a necessary first step toward the examination of phenotypic variation of these species based on differences in habitat hydrology.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:45 AM

Morphological characterization of exuvia from co-emerging riverine dragonflies using geometric morphometrics

Union Wisconsin Room

Among many evolutionary pressures, the physical environment plays a significant role in the refining organism morphology. The purpose of this study is to determine whether geometric morphometrics can be used to differentiate or characterize shape variation among species and sexes of co-emerging riverine dragonflies, including two rare species in New Brunswick, Canada: Ophiogompus howei and Gomphus ventricosus. Exuvia from 26 locations along the St. John and Miramichi Rivers were collected in June 2013. Exuvia were identified to species and landmarks were digitized on digital micrographs of the dorsal and ventral surfaces. A multivariate analysis of variance was used to test for differences in body shape between species and sexes within a species. We expect to find significant levels of variation among species in support of taxonomic diagnosis, but fewer differences between sexes with a species. A detailed analysis of shape will help to confirm the presence of rare and protected species at these sites. Furthermore, this analysis provides a necessary first step toward the examination of phenotypic variation of these species based on differences in habitat hydrology.