Event Title

Intrauterine and Perinatal Bisphenol-A Exposure and Neonatal Body Composition

Mentor 1

Teresa Johnson

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

Purpose:The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship of BPA in maternal and infant urine samples with infant body composition. Infant body composition was obtained via infant anthropometric measurements, Air Displacement Plethsmography (ADP). Bisphenol-A (BPA) is found in items such as plastics, can linings, baby bottles, papers, medical equipment etc and is reported to be an estrogen disruptor and environmental obesogen. Animal studies have demonstrated that BPA is associated with increased obesity and visceral fat. Although we know human exposure is common, investigation into the impact of BPA on obesity in infants and children has been limited. Methods:BPA was measured from maternal and infant urine specimens. ADP is measured with an instrument called PEAPOD® that uses infant weight and length, and air pressure to calculate fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM). The DEXA is conducted with a low dose X-Ray scan to calculate body composition (FM and FFM). The amount of radiation in the DEXA scan is low (< 1/10 of a chest x-ray). Results:Of a targeted recruitment of 45 mother-infant dyads, only 19 dyads were recruited, because of multiple issues with the reliability of the PEAPOD® during the first four months of data collection, and then issues with the state board of radiation for the infant DEXAs.

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Intrauterine and Perinatal Bisphenol-A Exposure and Neonatal Body Composition

Union Wisconsin Room

Purpose:The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship of BPA in maternal and infant urine samples with infant body composition. Infant body composition was obtained via infant anthropometric measurements, Air Displacement Plethsmography (ADP). Bisphenol-A (BPA) is found in items such as plastics, can linings, baby bottles, papers, medical equipment etc and is reported to be an estrogen disruptor and environmental obesogen. Animal studies have demonstrated that BPA is associated with increased obesity and visceral fat. Although we know human exposure is common, investigation into the impact of BPA on obesity in infants and children has been limited. Methods:BPA was measured from maternal and infant urine specimens. ADP is measured with an instrument called PEAPOD® that uses infant weight and length, and air pressure to calculate fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM). The DEXA is conducted with a low dose X-Ray scan to calculate body composition (FM and FFM). The amount of radiation in the DEXA scan is low (< 1/10 of a chest x-ray). Results:Of a targeted recruitment of 45 mother-infant dyads, only 19 dyads were recruited, because of multiple issues with the reliability of the PEAPOD® during the first four months of data collection, and then issues with the state board of radiation for the infant DEXAs.