Event Title

Investigation of Attention Bias to Cigarette-Related Cues among Cigarette Smokers

Mentor 1

Hanjoo Lee

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

A wide body of literature has demonstrated a robust relationship between attentional bias (AB) to emotionally-valence stimuli (e.g., words, faces) and psychological outcome (e.g., anxiety reduction). As such, novel interventions were developed with the aim of reducing negative psychological outcome through the mechanism of AB. The results have been promising, as a number of randomized clinical trials have demonstrated positive results (e.g., reductions in AB were related to reductions in anxiety-related symptoms). While much is known about the relationship between AB and anxiety-related disorders and depression, less is known about the relationship between AB and cigarette smoking. To our knowledge, only one study has examined this relationship using a single-session AB modification program. They demonstrated that AB to cigarette-related cues could be increased or decreased depending on training condition (attend or disengage). There were no significant difference between nicotine craving among women; however, men in the disengage condition reported less nicotine cravings than men in the attend condition. Given that AB to cigarette-related cues is malleable, the purpose of the current study was to further our understanding of the relationship between AB and cigarette-related cues. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between AB and smoking-related cues presented at early processing (500ms) and late processing 2000ms). Sixty-six nicotine-dependent individuals from the community were enrolled. Each enrolled participant completed a battery of questionnaires. Baseline data was used for the current analysis. A paired-sample t-test was conducted to evaluate the difference between early and late AB to cigarette-related cues among individuals who smoke cigarettes. The results provide evidence for a differential AB to cigarette-related cues relationship. There was a greater level of attentional bias at late processing (i.e., 2000ms) than early processing (i.e., 500ms), M = 48.46 and M = .511, respectively, t (65) = 3.88, p <.001, 95% CI [23.28, 72.62]. These findings suggest that AB modification interventions aimed at reducing AB to cigarette-related cues, should consider presenting AB stimuli at different intervals (e.g., 500ms, 2000ms, 5000ms).

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Investigation of Attention Bias to Cigarette-Related Cues among Cigarette Smokers

Union Wisconsin Room

A wide body of literature has demonstrated a robust relationship between attentional bias (AB) to emotionally-valence stimuli (e.g., words, faces) and psychological outcome (e.g., anxiety reduction). As such, novel interventions were developed with the aim of reducing negative psychological outcome through the mechanism of AB. The results have been promising, as a number of randomized clinical trials have demonstrated positive results (e.g., reductions in AB were related to reductions in anxiety-related symptoms). While much is known about the relationship between AB and anxiety-related disorders and depression, less is known about the relationship between AB and cigarette smoking. To our knowledge, only one study has examined this relationship using a single-session AB modification program. They demonstrated that AB to cigarette-related cues could be increased or decreased depending on training condition (attend or disengage). There were no significant difference between nicotine craving among women; however, men in the disengage condition reported less nicotine cravings than men in the attend condition. Given that AB to cigarette-related cues is malleable, the purpose of the current study was to further our understanding of the relationship between AB and cigarette-related cues. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between AB and smoking-related cues presented at early processing (500ms) and late processing 2000ms). Sixty-six nicotine-dependent individuals from the community were enrolled. Each enrolled participant completed a battery of questionnaires. Baseline data was used for the current analysis. A paired-sample t-test was conducted to evaluate the difference between early and late AB to cigarette-related cues among individuals who smoke cigarettes. The results provide evidence for a differential AB to cigarette-related cues relationship. There was a greater level of attentional bias at late processing (i.e., 2000ms) than early processing (i.e., 500ms), M = 48.46 and M = .511, respectively, t (65) = 3.88, p <.001, 95% CI [23.28, 72.62]. These findings suggest that AB modification interventions aimed at reducing AB to cigarette-related cues, should consider presenting AB stimuli at different intervals (e.g., 500ms, 2000ms, 5000ms).