Event Title

Sex Differences in Elite Indoor Rowing Times: The Potential Role of Participation

Mentor 1

Dr. Kevin Keenan

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

Introduction: Sex differences in elite running and swimming performance have been reported to be due to physiological differences and unequal participation between men and women. Collegiate women’s rowing programs have experienced arguably larger relative gains in participation than any other sport since Title IX was enacted in 1972. For example, since 1997 when women’s rowing became an NCAA sport, the number of collegiate women’s teams has increased 48% to 145 teams in 2014. In contrast, men’s participation in collegiate rowing has declined by 35% to 58 teams over the same time period. The purpose of this study was to examine if the change in participation level between men and women from 1996 to 2014 was associated with a change in elite indoor rowing times. Methods: The top 10 finishing times for Open and Junior (i.e., high school) groups for men and women competing in the C.R.A.S.H.-B Sprints World Indoor Rowing Championships were obtained. The time in seconds necessary to complete the 2000 m race were averaged over the years 1996-99 and 2011-14 for the top 10 finishing places in each group. ANOVA was performed with between-subjects factor of sex and within-subjects factor of year. Results: Junior women’s times decreased (p < .001) from the late 90s (444.37 ± 17.28 s) to present day (430.51 ± 7.51 s), while Junior men’s times from the late 90s (380.55 ± 9.04 s) were not significantly different (p > .08) from the present day (376.03 ± 5.42 s). Open women’s times were not significantly different (p > .5) from the late 90s (413.45 ± 6.56 s) to present day (413.08 ± 7.63 s); however, Open men’s times increased significantly (p < .001) from the late 90s (352.20 ± 5.48) to present day (357.57 ± 3.70), indicating a decrease in performance. Discussion: Since the 1990s Junior women’s indoor rowing times have significantly decreased, likely influenced by increased participation due to greater opportunities available to women rowing in college. For example, in 2014, 7,688 women competed collegiately in rowing, compared with only 2,423 men. The enticement of athletic scholarships has likely accounted for a large part of this growth. The NCAA limits the number of scholarships in any sport, and with 20 scholarships available per school for women’s rowing, rowing has more than any other sport but football. Interestingly, over the same time period Open men’s times have increased, likely also reflecting changes in participation.

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Sex Differences in Elite Indoor Rowing Times: The Potential Role of Participation

Union Wisconsin Room

Introduction: Sex differences in elite running and swimming performance have been reported to be due to physiological differences and unequal participation between men and women. Collegiate women’s rowing programs have experienced arguably larger relative gains in participation than any other sport since Title IX was enacted in 1972. For example, since 1997 when women’s rowing became an NCAA sport, the number of collegiate women’s teams has increased 48% to 145 teams in 2014. In contrast, men’s participation in collegiate rowing has declined by 35% to 58 teams over the same time period. The purpose of this study was to examine if the change in participation level between men and women from 1996 to 2014 was associated with a change in elite indoor rowing times. Methods: The top 10 finishing times for Open and Junior (i.e., high school) groups for men and women competing in the C.R.A.S.H.-B Sprints World Indoor Rowing Championships were obtained. The time in seconds necessary to complete the 2000 m race were averaged over the years 1996-99 and 2011-14 for the top 10 finishing places in each group. ANOVA was performed with between-subjects factor of sex and within-subjects factor of year. Results: Junior women’s times decreased (p < .001) from the late 90s (444.37 ± 17.28 s) to present day (430.51 ± 7.51 s), while Junior men’s times from the late 90s (380.55 ± 9.04 s) were not significantly different (p > .08) from the present day (376.03 ± 5.42 s). Open women’s times were not significantly different (p > .5) from the late 90s (413.45 ± 6.56 s) to present day (413.08 ± 7.63 s); however, Open men’s times increased significantly (p < .001) from the late 90s (352.20 ± 5.48) to present day (357.57 ± 3.70), indicating a decrease in performance. Discussion: Since the 1990s Junior women’s indoor rowing times have significantly decreased, likely influenced by increased participation due to greater opportunities available to women rowing in college. For example, in 2014, 7,688 women competed collegiately in rowing, compared with only 2,423 men. The enticement of athletic scholarships has likely accounted for a large part of this growth. The NCAA limits the number of scholarships in any sport, and with 20 scholarships available per school for women’s rowing, rowing has more than any other sport but football. Interestingly, over the same time period Open men’s times have increased, likely also reflecting changes in participation.