Event Title

COMPARISON OF CARBONIFEROUS AND CRETACEOUS OCEANIC ANOXIC EVENT (OAE) GEOCHEMISTRY AND RELATION TO PALEOECOLOGY

Mentor 1

Rex Hanger

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE) are time periods when oxygen levels of ancient oceans dropped to levels that were lethal to marine organisms. Occurring throughout the fossil record, OAE are recognized by distinctive geochemical signatures (high ratios of Th/U, Ni/Co, Ce anomaly), and their effects on ancient organisms (size reduction, decreased relative abundance, unique preservation types, and extirpation or complete extinction.) My research will focus on regional scale OAE from two time periods at two localities, the Upper Carboniferous (~ 307-304 million years ago) in southeastern Nebraska and the Middle Cretaceous (~113-100 million years ago) in central Texas, studying and comparing the geochemistry and paleoecology as indicators of oxygen levels during pre-, during- and post-OAE. With this data a simple model can be created for a regional OAE and expand this to a larger model. This model would be useful because it will be able to predict what these Oceanic Anoxic Events can do during global mass extinction events during other geologic time periods.

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Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

COMPARISON OF CARBONIFEROUS AND CRETACEOUS OCEANIC ANOXIC EVENT (OAE) GEOCHEMISTRY AND RELATION TO PALEOECOLOGY

Union Wisconsin Room

Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAE) are time periods when oxygen levels of ancient oceans dropped to levels that were lethal to marine organisms. Occurring throughout the fossil record, OAE are recognized by distinctive geochemical signatures (high ratios of Th/U, Ni/Co, Ce anomaly), and their effects on ancient organisms (size reduction, decreased relative abundance, unique preservation types, and extirpation or complete extinction.) My research will focus on regional scale OAE from two time periods at two localities, the Upper Carboniferous (~ 307-304 million years ago) in southeastern Nebraska and the Middle Cretaceous (~113-100 million years ago) in central Texas, studying and comparing the geochemistry and paleoecology as indicators of oxygen levels during pre-, during- and post-OAE. With this data a simple model can be created for a regional OAE and expand this to a larger model. This model would be useful because it will be able to predict what these Oceanic Anoxic Events can do during global mass extinction events during other geologic time periods.