Event Title

Exploring the Affective Domain in Introductory Chemistry courses - A Cluster Analyses Study

Mentor 1

Kristen Murphy

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

24-4-2015 2:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2015 3:45 PM

Description

Over the past decade or so, persistence in STEM has become a widely discussed issue among educators and policy makers alike. Given that fewer than fifty percent of students who enter college to major in a STEM field actually complete a STEM degree and that these numbers become even less optimistic when studying underrepresented gender subgroups, it is crucial to examine the factors that contribute to declining persistence in STEM. / While much of the research in STEM persistence has focused on math and engineering domains, with an emphasis on understanding cognitive factors, investigating and understanding persistence in STEM is no longer a purely academic question. Regardless of ability, students’ interests, motivations and beliefs about themselves have a far reaching impact on whether they “persist”, “switch” fields or leave STEM entirely. This study aims to explore the affective domain in introductory chemistry courses using Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) as the framework. Emerging from this model are two key building blocks (constructs) of academic / career choice and development – self-efficacy and outcome expectations. / Using data collected from administering the Chemistry Self-Efficacy and Chemistry Outcome Expectations surveys (CSES and COES respectively) to students in introductory chemistry, this study aims to explore these constructs using a new research method – cluster analysis. The results of these analyses will not only help establish the validity of both surveys, but also aid in creating academic and affective profiles of students in introductory chemistry. Ultimately, these profiles will play a role in the predictive STEM persistence model and help us understand the unique role of introductory chemistry in a student’s academic path towards a STEM degree.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 2:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:45 PM

Exploring the Affective Domain in Introductory Chemistry courses - A Cluster Analyses Study

Union Wisconsin Room

Over the past decade or so, persistence in STEM has become a widely discussed issue among educators and policy makers alike. Given that fewer than fifty percent of students who enter college to major in a STEM field actually complete a STEM degree and that these numbers become even less optimistic when studying underrepresented gender subgroups, it is crucial to examine the factors that contribute to declining persistence in STEM. / While much of the research in STEM persistence has focused on math and engineering domains, with an emphasis on understanding cognitive factors, investigating and understanding persistence in STEM is no longer a purely academic question. Regardless of ability, students’ interests, motivations and beliefs about themselves have a far reaching impact on whether they “persist”, “switch” fields or leave STEM entirely. This study aims to explore the affective domain in introductory chemistry courses using Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) as the framework. Emerging from this model are two key building blocks (constructs) of academic / career choice and development – self-efficacy and outcome expectations. / Using data collected from administering the Chemistry Self-Efficacy and Chemistry Outcome Expectations surveys (CSES and COES respectively) to students in introductory chemistry, this study aims to explore these constructs using a new research method – cluster analysis. The results of these analyses will not only help establish the validity of both surveys, but also aid in creating academic and affective profiles of students in introductory chemistry. Ultimately, these profiles will play a role in the predictive STEM persistence model and help us understand the unique role of introductory chemistry in a student’s academic path towards a STEM degree.