Event Title

Gas Chromatography- Solid-Phase Microextraction Method to Study Kinetics of the Maillard Reaction

Mentor 1

J. Aldstadt

Location

Union 280

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:00 PM

Description

The Maillard Reaction, commonly referred to as a “browning reaction”, involves a series of pathways by which sugars and amino acids condense. This reaction has importance in a wide range of fields because the products are found in food as well as form naturally in the human body. The late stages of the reaction in vivo produce advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), which have adverse effects on protein function. The reaction factors such as pH, temperature, and ionic strength result in broad varieties of products. The intermediate mechanisms and kinetics are not well understood. Beginning with simple two reactant solutions of methylglyoxal (MGO) and phenylalanine methyl ester with phosphate buffer, Maillard Reactions were initiated under different pH conditions. A Gas Chromatography method, using solid-phase microextraction, was optimized to separate the components of the mixture in early stages of the reaction. In addition, o-phenylenediamine was used to derivatize the MGO to quantitatively measure the disappearance of this reactant over time. In chromatograms of Maillard Reaction mixtures, the emergence of product peaks accompanies the decrease of MGO. Products form earlier at higher pH, matching observations. It is suggested that MGO, the model sugar, has a greater influence on the reaction rate than the amino acid.

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM

Gas Chromatography- Solid-Phase Microextraction Method to Study Kinetics of the Maillard Reaction

Union 280

The Maillard Reaction, commonly referred to as a “browning reaction”, involves a series of pathways by which sugars and amino acids condense. This reaction has importance in a wide range of fields because the products are found in food as well as form naturally in the human body. The late stages of the reaction in vivo produce advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), which have adverse effects on protein function. The reaction factors such as pH, temperature, and ionic strength result in broad varieties of products. The intermediate mechanisms and kinetics are not well understood. Beginning with simple two reactant solutions of methylglyoxal (MGO) and phenylalanine methyl ester with phosphate buffer, Maillard Reactions were initiated under different pH conditions. A Gas Chromatography method, using solid-phase microextraction, was optimized to separate the components of the mixture in early stages of the reaction. In addition, o-phenylenediamine was used to derivatize the MGO to quantitatively measure the disappearance of this reactant over time. In chromatograms of Maillard Reaction mixtures, the emergence of product peaks accompanies the decrease of MGO. Products form earlier at higher pH, matching observations. It is suggested that MGO, the model sugar, has a greater influence on the reaction rate than the amino acid.