Event Title

Breastfeeding Support for African American Women

Mentor 1

Dr. Teresa Johnson

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Background: African American women have the lowest breastfeeding rates among all race/ethnic groups in the United States. Although breastfeeding trends in the United States have significantly improved in the past decade, rates are substantially lower than healthy people 2020 objectives of 81% at initiation, 60.6% at 6 months and 34.1 at 12 months, as well as 46.2% exclusively breastfeeding at 3 months, with 25.5% exclusively breastfeeding at 6 months. Researchers have consistently documented the effects of breast-feeding support and the positive impact that husband/ partner, family members, friends, childcare providers and health care providers can have to help African American mothers’ breastfeed their newborns. Methods: A literature review on breastfeeding among African American women was conducted and questions for the focus groups were developed. Participants were recruited using a flyer in multiple agencies and organizations in the community where African-American live, play, shop, and worship, in addition to word of mouth. Results: Focus groups responses from African American women who breastfeed have identified common barriers, which impact their breastfeeding decision-making such as social stigma, personal barriers, and lack of perceived support of financial and emotional. Women also reported that family, friends, and community resources influenced breastfeeding decisions. Women also considered other factors in their decision-making such as health, economic, convenience, and time impacts and role models. African American men highly recommended that women maintain a healthy lifestyle and that the breastfeeding mom should avoid smoking, drinking, or substance abuse. Conclusions: This study suggests that the likelihood of breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity increases with interventions such as providing educational information from family, peers, friends, and health care providers, community centers or WIC and importantly the public community. More studies are needed to test culturally appropriate interventions within the community to increase rates of breastfeeding among African American women in their community.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Breastfeeding Support for African American Women

Union Wisconsin Room

Background: African American women have the lowest breastfeeding rates among all race/ethnic groups in the United States. Although breastfeeding trends in the United States have significantly improved in the past decade, rates are substantially lower than healthy people 2020 objectives of 81% at initiation, 60.6% at 6 months and 34.1 at 12 months, as well as 46.2% exclusively breastfeeding at 3 months, with 25.5% exclusively breastfeeding at 6 months. Researchers have consistently documented the effects of breast-feeding support and the positive impact that husband/ partner, family members, friends, childcare providers and health care providers can have to help African American mothers’ breastfeed their newborns. Methods: A literature review on breastfeeding among African American women was conducted and questions for the focus groups were developed. Participants were recruited using a flyer in multiple agencies and organizations in the community where African-American live, play, shop, and worship, in addition to word of mouth. Results: Focus groups responses from African American women who breastfeed have identified common barriers, which impact their breastfeeding decision-making such as social stigma, personal barriers, and lack of perceived support of financial and emotional. Women also reported that family, friends, and community resources influenced breastfeeding decisions. Women also considered other factors in their decision-making such as health, economic, convenience, and time impacts and role models. African American men highly recommended that women maintain a healthy lifestyle and that the breastfeeding mom should avoid smoking, drinking, or substance abuse. Conclusions: This study suggests that the likelihood of breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity increases with interventions such as providing educational information from family, peers, friends, and health care providers, community centers or WIC and importantly the public community. More studies are needed to test culturally appropriate interventions within the community to increase rates of breastfeeding among African American women in their community.