Event Title

Surface Modifications to Construct Self-Healing Hydrophobic Surfaces For the Water Industry

Mentor 1

Dr. Pradeep Rohatgi

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Pipes and other plumbing fixtures often dissolve and leak materials into the water supply they are transporting leading to both aesthetic and health problems. Reducing corrosion, fouling, and wearing of components in the water industry can be done by developing a low cost, durable hydrophobic surface as current anti-corrosion coatings aren’t durable and often leak into water supply themselves contributing to the problem instead of solving it. A hydrophobic surface will increase the contact angles between the water and pipe material limiting the exchange of ions between the surfaces as well as reducing the frictional energy loss during water flow. This research focuses on demonstrating this phenomenon by examining the microstructure of the pipe material and establishing a relationship between the contact angles, corrosion rates, wear rates, and frictional energy loss that is done by water transport over long periods of time. A combination of techniques was used to adjust the microstructure of the material including oxidation, mechanical abrasion, polymeric coatings, and sol-gel coatings. Ideally, these techniques will work on in-situ surface modifications during conventional manufacturing and that the end product will have the ability to self-heal to prevent corrosion. To characterize the corrosion inhibition & self-healing effectiveness of the surface modifications were done by using scratch tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). The results indicated that the surface if fouled contained salts of Mg, Na, and K spread out evenly on the surface along with chunks of compounds primarily containing Al, K, Si, and O. The coated surfaces helped decrease fouling, but there were some drawbacks as well; coatings showed low mechanical stability and bonding with the pipe material, was only able to self-heal in the presence of atmospheric oxygen, and wasn’t able to self-heal multiple times in the same location.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Surface Modifications to Construct Self-Healing Hydrophobic Surfaces For the Water Industry

Union Wisconsin Room

Pipes and other plumbing fixtures often dissolve and leak materials into the water supply they are transporting leading to both aesthetic and health problems. Reducing corrosion, fouling, and wearing of components in the water industry can be done by developing a low cost, durable hydrophobic surface as current anti-corrosion coatings aren’t durable and often leak into water supply themselves contributing to the problem instead of solving it. A hydrophobic surface will increase the contact angles between the water and pipe material limiting the exchange of ions between the surfaces as well as reducing the frictional energy loss during water flow. This research focuses on demonstrating this phenomenon by examining the microstructure of the pipe material and establishing a relationship between the contact angles, corrosion rates, wear rates, and frictional energy loss that is done by water transport over long periods of time. A combination of techniques was used to adjust the microstructure of the material including oxidation, mechanical abrasion, polymeric coatings, and sol-gel coatings. Ideally, these techniques will work on in-situ surface modifications during conventional manufacturing and that the end product will have the ability to self-heal to prevent corrosion. To characterize the corrosion inhibition & self-healing effectiveness of the surface modifications were done by using scratch tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET). The results indicated that the surface if fouled contained salts of Mg, Na, and K spread out evenly on the surface along with chunks of compounds primarily containing Al, K, Si, and O. The coated surfaces helped decrease fouling, but there were some drawbacks as well; coatings showed low mechanical stability and bonding with the pipe material, was only able to self-heal in the presence of atmospheric oxygen, and wasn’t able to self-heal multiple times in the same location.