Event Title

Gelatin Phantom with a Cavity to Mimic The Intestine- Used in Proton Therapy Experiments

Mentor 1

Sarah K Patch

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Purpose: To mimic human intestine morphology and soft tissue properties for ultrasound imaging to detect the displacement of the Bragg peak of a proton beam when comparing an empty cavity to one filled with olive oil. Methods: In order to perform proton therapy experiments, a phantom with similar acoustic properties and stopping power as the tissue surrounding the intestine was developed. A mold was designed, into which the tissue mimicking (TM) material was poured into and left to cure. The TM material was prepared based on the procedures described by Lazebnick, et. al. On one side of the mold, a Styrofoam cone was positioned to act as air and allow the proton beam to extend 2 cm into the phantom before being stopped by the TM as well as the contents of the intestinal cavity. To make the intestinal cavity, a curved hose was positioned and left inside the mold while the phantom was curing. Experiments were done at the 88” cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Proton beam was shot through the center of the cone, the TM material between the tip of the cone and the cavity, then traveled through the cavity. When the cavity was empty, the Bragg peak was recorded at a further distance compared to when the intestinal cavity was filled with olive oil. Bragg peak was recorded using ultrasound transducers that detected thermoacoustic pulses generated from heating up the TM material.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Gelatin Phantom with a Cavity to Mimic The Intestine- Used in Proton Therapy Experiments

Union Wisconsin Room

Purpose: To mimic human intestine morphology and soft tissue properties for ultrasound imaging to detect the displacement of the Bragg peak of a proton beam when comparing an empty cavity to one filled with olive oil. Methods: In order to perform proton therapy experiments, a phantom with similar acoustic properties and stopping power as the tissue surrounding the intestine was developed. A mold was designed, into which the tissue mimicking (TM) material was poured into and left to cure. The TM material was prepared based on the procedures described by Lazebnick, et. al. On one side of the mold, a Styrofoam cone was positioned to act as air and allow the proton beam to extend 2 cm into the phantom before being stopped by the TM as well as the contents of the intestinal cavity. To make the intestinal cavity, a curved hose was positioned and left inside the mold while the phantom was curing. Experiments were done at the 88” cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Proton beam was shot through the center of the cone, the TM material between the tip of the cone and the cavity, then traveled through the cavity. When the cavity was empty, the Bragg peak was recorded at a further distance compared to when the intestinal cavity was filled with olive oil. Bragg peak was recorded using ultrasound transducers that detected thermoacoustic pulses generated from heating up the TM material.