Event Title

Acceptability of Web-Based Response Inhibition Training in Children with Williams Syndrome

Mentor 1

Dr. Bonita Klein-Tasman

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition caused by a deletion on chromosome 7. Children with Williams syndrome (WS) often exhibit a lack of response inhibition, or the inability to restrain unwanted or inappropriate behaviors. In a study conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 20 children with WS ages 10-17 participated in a computer-based response inhibition training program over the course of several weeks. This web-based training was designed as part of a pilot study aimed at improving individuals’ response inhibition ability. The goal of the current study is to evaluate the acceptability of this pilot intervention based on feedback given to us by parents. Three questionnaires were administered to parents upon their child’s completion of the treatment: the Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form (TEI), the Treatment Acceptability Questionnaire (TAQ), and a questionnaire specific to this study, the After Treatment Questionnaire (ATQ). Results from the TEI (n=17) show that over 40% of parents agreed or strongly agreed that this treatment is an acceptable way of dealing with their child’s behavior problem, 76.4% stated that they had a positive reaction to this treatment, while only 11.8% agreed or strongly agreed that the treatment would likely result in permanent improvement. Results from the TAQ (n=18) indicate that 72.3% of the respondents found the treatment to be somewhere in the slightly acceptable to very acceptable range, and on average, parents consider this treatment to be neither effective nor ineffective. Results from the ATQ are currently being collected and analyzed. The data from these post-treatment surveys demonstrate that most parents had a positive reaction to this treatment, albeit they did not expect lasting changes to their child’s behavior. The results from these surveys will help researchers improve the web-based treatment for future use with children with Williams syndrome.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Acceptability of Web-Based Response Inhibition Training in Children with Williams Syndrome

Union Wisconsin Room

Williams syndrome is a rare genetic condition caused by a deletion on chromosome 7. Children with Williams syndrome (WS) often exhibit a lack of response inhibition, or the inability to restrain unwanted or inappropriate behaviors. In a study conducted by the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 20 children with WS ages 10-17 participated in a computer-based response inhibition training program over the course of several weeks. This web-based training was designed as part of a pilot study aimed at improving individuals’ response inhibition ability. The goal of the current study is to evaluate the acceptability of this pilot intervention based on feedback given to us by parents. Three questionnaires were administered to parents upon their child’s completion of the treatment: the Treatment Evaluation Inventory-Short Form (TEI), the Treatment Acceptability Questionnaire (TAQ), and a questionnaire specific to this study, the After Treatment Questionnaire (ATQ). Results from the TEI (n=17) show that over 40% of parents agreed or strongly agreed that this treatment is an acceptable way of dealing with their child’s behavior problem, 76.4% stated that they had a positive reaction to this treatment, while only 11.8% agreed or strongly agreed that the treatment would likely result in permanent improvement. Results from the TAQ (n=18) indicate that 72.3% of the respondents found the treatment to be somewhere in the slightly acceptable to very acceptable range, and on average, parents consider this treatment to be neither effective nor ineffective. Results from the ATQ are currently being collected and analyzed. The data from these post-treatment surveys demonstrate that most parents had a positive reaction to this treatment, albeit they did not expect lasting changes to their child’s behavior. The results from these surveys will help researchers improve the web-based treatment for future use with children with Williams syndrome.