Event Title

Rest and Recovery in the Competitive Phase of Training in Collegiate Female Volleyball Athletes

Mentor 1

Barbara Meyer, PhD

Mentor 2

Stacy Gnacinski

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

BACKGROUND: Previous literature suggests that monitoring athletes’ stress and recovery can help sports medicine practitioners optimize performance, reduce risk of injury, and reduce symptoms of overtraining and burnout across a competitive season (Coutts et al., 2007; Kellman, 2010). The majority of research in this area has focused on monitoring changes in psychological and physical variables in response to training phases, and very little research has been conducted to monitor measures of these variables in response to competitive phases. PURPOSE: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the changes in the recovery-stress states and the physical performance of collegiate female volleyball athletes across the competitive season. METHODS: Eleven female collegiate volleyball players completed the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes survey to assess recovery-stress states and counter movement jumps (CMJ) to assess physical performance at five different time points across a five-week period (T1-T5). To examine changes in the recovery-stress states and CMJ across time, two separate repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVAs) were calculated. RESULTS: The repeated measures ANOVA calculations revealed significant main effects of time on recovery-stress states, F(4,36) = 3.614, p < .05, ηp2=0.286, and CMJ performance, F(4,40) = 10.562, p < .05, ηp2=0.514. Post hoc pairwise comparisons further revealed significant recovery-stress state mean differences between T4 and all other time points (p < .05), and significant CMJ mean differences between T3 and all other time points (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the current study indicate that time during a competitive season may have an effect on the recovery-stress states and physical performance of collegiate athletes. This is consistent with previous studies showing effects of training load on athletes’ recovery-stress states (Freitas et al., 2014). The mechanisms of this time-related effect have yet to be examined.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Rest and Recovery in the Competitive Phase of Training in Collegiate Female Volleyball Athletes

Union Wisconsin Room

BACKGROUND: Previous literature suggests that monitoring athletes’ stress and recovery can help sports medicine practitioners optimize performance, reduce risk of injury, and reduce symptoms of overtraining and burnout across a competitive season (Coutts et al., 2007; Kellman, 2010). The majority of research in this area has focused on monitoring changes in psychological and physical variables in response to training phases, and very little research has been conducted to monitor measures of these variables in response to competitive phases. PURPOSE: The purpose of the current study was to investigate the changes in the recovery-stress states and the physical performance of collegiate female volleyball athletes across the competitive season. METHODS: Eleven female collegiate volleyball players completed the Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes survey to assess recovery-stress states and counter movement jumps (CMJ) to assess physical performance at five different time points across a five-week period (T1-T5). To examine changes in the recovery-stress states and CMJ across time, two separate repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVAs) were calculated. RESULTS: The repeated measures ANOVA calculations revealed significant main effects of time on recovery-stress states, F(4,36) = 3.614, p < .05, ηp2=0.286, and CMJ performance, F(4,40) = 10.562, p < .05, ηp2=0.514. Post hoc pairwise comparisons further revealed significant recovery-stress state mean differences between T4 and all other time points (p < .05), and significant CMJ mean differences between T3 and all other time points (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Results of the current study indicate that time during a competitive season may have an effect on the recovery-stress states and physical performance of collegiate athletes. This is consistent with previous studies showing effects of training load on athletes’ recovery-stress states (Freitas et al., 2014). The mechanisms of this time-related effect have yet to be examined.