Event Title

Examining Auditory Discrimination Training Procedures with Children

Mentor 1

Tiffany Kodak

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

An auditory discrimination involves hearing and telling the difference between sounds such as words or environmental stimuli. An example of an auditory discrimination is walking to the door, rather than picking up the phone, after the doorbell rings. Past research suggests auditory discrimination is an important skill for individuals to learn and may be a prerequisite skill for language development. Most children learn to discriminate sounds through everyday experiences. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or ASD-like behavior may fail to acquire auditory discriminations without direct instruction (Serna, in press). At present, little behavior analytic research on auditory discrimination training procedures has been published. The current study aims to assess the efficacy (e.g., number of sessions to mastery) and efficiency (e.g., number of seconds to mastery) of three auditory discrimination procedures using single subject research methodology, specifically an adapted alternating treatments design, with two children with ASD-like behavior. The three procedures include: auditory match-to-sample, do this/do that, and go/no-go. Participants’ acquisition of auditory discriminations using the three procedures and differentiation between the amount of time needed to acquire the skills will inform clinical practice as well as behavior analytic literature regarding efficacious and efficient strategies to assess and teach auditory discriminations.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Examining Auditory Discrimination Training Procedures with Children

Union Wisconsin Room

An auditory discrimination involves hearing and telling the difference between sounds such as words or environmental stimuli. An example of an auditory discrimination is walking to the door, rather than picking up the phone, after the doorbell rings. Past research suggests auditory discrimination is an important skill for individuals to learn and may be a prerequisite skill for language development. Most children learn to discriminate sounds through everyday experiences. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or ASD-like behavior may fail to acquire auditory discriminations without direct instruction (Serna, in press). At present, little behavior analytic research on auditory discrimination training procedures has been published. The current study aims to assess the efficacy (e.g., number of sessions to mastery) and efficiency (e.g., number of seconds to mastery) of three auditory discrimination procedures using single subject research methodology, specifically an adapted alternating treatments design, with two children with ASD-like behavior. The three procedures include: auditory match-to-sample, do this/do that, and go/no-go. Participants’ acquisition of auditory discriminations using the three procedures and differentiation between the amount of time needed to acquire the skills will inform clinical practice as well as behavior analytic literature regarding efficacious and efficient strategies to assess and teach auditory discriminations.