Event Title

Assessing Consistency of Anthropometric Measures in Children With Spina Bifida

Mentor 1

Kathleen J. Sawin, PhD, CPNP-PC, FAAN

Mentor 2

Michele L. Polfuss, PhD, RN, CPNP-AC/PC

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Background: Obesity, a public health problem, is commonly defined by a body mass index (BMI) calculation, based on an individual’s height and weight. Individuals with spina bifida (SB) are known to have a higher prevalence of obesity compared to the general population. Spina bifida is a birth defect that occurs secondary to the incomplete closure of the spine during gestation. Depending on the level of lesion, associated complications of SB may include physical and intellectual disabilities. The physical disabilities (i.e. contractures, scoliosis, kyphosis and paralysis of the lower extremities) impact the ability to obtain an accurate height and weight measurement. This inaccuracy creates a barrier in determining BMI and categorizing obesity, therefore affecting a provider’s ability to treat their patient efficiently. Purpose: To evaluate the consistency of methods to obtain height and weight values used by 19 pediatric spina bifida clinics who are currently part of the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry. Methods: This project includes phone interviews with designated site coordinators and clinic staff of 19 spina bifida clinics across the nation (total of 38 interviews). An interview guide was created based on a previous survey and focuses primarily on training, procedures for height and weight, measurement tools used, and variances by age of patient. Data will be compiled and depicted by the qualitative summary, frequency of specific answers to interview questions, and descriptions to further provide information. Results: A summary of previous survey results and added information obtained from phone interviews will be included. Conclusion: Substantial variation exists between practices when obtaining anthropometric measures in children with spina bifida. This inconsistency creates additional challenges when attempting to document or prevent obesity in a population that is at high risk for an abnormal weight status. Further evaluation of measurement methodology and implementation of measurement standards is needed.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Assessing Consistency of Anthropometric Measures in Children With Spina Bifida

Union Wisconsin Room

Background: Obesity, a public health problem, is commonly defined by a body mass index (BMI) calculation, based on an individual’s height and weight. Individuals with spina bifida (SB) are known to have a higher prevalence of obesity compared to the general population. Spina bifida is a birth defect that occurs secondary to the incomplete closure of the spine during gestation. Depending on the level of lesion, associated complications of SB may include physical and intellectual disabilities. The physical disabilities (i.e. contractures, scoliosis, kyphosis and paralysis of the lower extremities) impact the ability to obtain an accurate height and weight measurement. This inaccuracy creates a barrier in determining BMI and categorizing obesity, therefore affecting a provider’s ability to treat their patient efficiently. Purpose: To evaluate the consistency of methods to obtain height and weight values used by 19 pediatric spina bifida clinics who are currently part of the National Spina Bifida Patient Registry. Methods: This project includes phone interviews with designated site coordinators and clinic staff of 19 spina bifida clinics across the nation (total of 38 interviews). An interview guide was created based on a previous survey and focuses primarily on training, procedures for height and weight, measurement tools used, and variances by age of patient. Data will be compiled and depicted by the qualitative summary, frequency of specific answers to interview questions, and descriptions to further provide information. Results: A summary of previous survey results and added information obtained from phone interviews will be included. Conclusion: Substantial variation exists between practices when obtaining anthropometric measures in children with spina bifida. This inconsistency creates additional challenges when attempting to document or prevent obesity in a population that is at high risk for an abnormal weight status. Further evaluation of measurement methodology and implementation of measurement standards is needed.