Event Title

Adsorption of Heavy Metal by a Natural and a Novel Engineered Porous Material

Mentor 1

Marcia Silva

Mentor 2

David Garmen

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

The major sources of mercury in the environment are coal-fired power plants, cement kilns, chlor-alkali plants, trash incinerators and gold mining. Mercury tends to accumulate in the environment (legacy mercury) being re-emitted from the soil and the water into the atmosphere, and vice versa. Mercury in the environment exists in three forms: elemental mercury, inorganic mercury compounds (primarily mercuric chloride), and organo-mercury compounds (primarily methyl mercury). All forms of mercury are quite toxic, and each form results in different adverse health effects. Their removal, capture or encapsulation is an aim for remediation processes. In this study, we aim to investigate the adsorption capacity and ability to remove inorganic compound, mercury (II), by a natural and by an engineered porous material. Total mercury analysis was performed by EPA method 1630. A column containing the porous material of study – natural and engineered – will be spiked with 3.4 mL (one pore volume) of 20 nano-gram per liter of mercury chloride (HgCl2). Subsequently 15 pore volumes of water will be flushed through the column. Concentration of mercury retained in the porous material matrix, interstitial water and in the liquid phase will be measured in each of the pore volumes. Distribution of pollutants within the materials (between solids and interstitial water) will be calculated in terms of distribution coefficient (Kd) ratio of the pollutants held by the sediment fractions to the concentration of the pollutants remaining in the interstitial water. Breakthrough curves will be plotted and % removal of total mercury from the water will be determined. Comparison will be established between the natural and the engineered material. As the engineered material has a surface area ten times larger than the unmodified material and three times smaller pore diameter, it is expected that the modified material will be able to remove more pollutants from water.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Adsorption of Heavy Metal by a Natural and a Novel Engineered Porous Material

Union Wisconsin Room

The major sources of mercury in the environment are coal-fired power plants, cement kilns, chlor-alkali plants, trash incinerators and gold mining. Mercury tends to accumulate in the environment (legacy mercury) being re-emitted from the soil and the water into the atmosphere, and vice versa. Mercury in the environment exists in three forms: elemental mercury, inorganic mercury compounds (primarily mercuric chloride), and organo-mercury compounds (primarily methyl mercury). All forms of mercury are quite toxic, and each form results in different adverse health effects. Their removal, capture or encapsulation is an aim for remediation processes. In this study, we aim to investigate the adsorption capacity and ability to remove inorganic compound, mercury (II), by a natural and by an engineered porous material. Total mercury analysis was performed by EPA method 1630. A column containing the porous material of study – natural and engineered – will be spiked with 3.4 mL (one pore volume) of 20 nano-gram per liter of mercury chloride (HgCl2). Subsequently 15 pore volumes of water will be flushed through the column. Concentration of mercury retained in the porous material matrix, interstitial water and in the liquid phase will be measured in each of the pore volumes. Distribution of pollutants within the materials (between solids and interstitial water) will be calculated in terms of distribution coefficient (Kd) ratio of the pollutants held by the sediment fractions to the concentration of the pollutants remaining in the interstitial water. Breakthrough curves will be plotted and % removal of total mercury from the water will be determined. Comparison will be established between the natural and the engineered material. As the engineered material has a surface area ten times larger than the unmodified material and three times smaller pore diameter, it is expected that the modified material will be able to remove more pollutants from water.