Event Title

Pre-pregnancy Obesity and Maternal Nutrition: Impact on Maternal Infant Health

Mentor 1

Teresa S. Johnson

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Women who are overweight and obese at conception have a higher risk for complications during pregnancy and postpartum and their infant are at higher risk for obesity and overweight. The purpose of this research is to conduct a literature review of weight management interventions pre/interconception, during pregnancy and postpartum that have been previously tested and demonstrate evidence of their maternal/child health outcomes. Literature was retrieved through searches of scholarly health databases such as pubmed with keywords: overweight, obesity, pregnancy outcomes, pregnancy interventions, pregnancy weight gain, gestational weight gain, birth outcomes, childhood obesity and Body Mass Index (BMI). The significant publications are being synthesized and organized into summary tables. The next step is to critically identify gaps and limitations of the current literature to help formulate the research protocol. Some categories being considered in intervention outcomes include: effectiveness, retention, cultural context, cost, low income mothers, self-efficacy, individualized interventions, and BMI testing. Results thus far are demonstrating a correlation with individualized, home-based weight management interventions to improve maternal and infant outcomes. In one study, postpartum women who participated in diet interventions (one trial; n = 53; MD 1.70 kg; 95% confidence interval (CI)-2.08 to -1.32) or diet plus exercise interventions (seven trials; n+ 573; MD – 1/93 kg; 95% CI-2/96 to -0.89; random-effects, T (2) = 1.09, I(2)= 71%) lost significantly more weight than those who only took part in exercise interventions (two trials; n = 53; MD – 0.10 kg; 95% CI-2.08 to -1.32). These findings could indicate the need for weight management interventions and resources to emphasize diet as a part of standard of practice for overweight and obese pregnant women. The research could also indicate the need for healthcare providers to emphasize the importance of good pre-pregnancy nutritional health to decrease risk for poor maternal and infant outcomes.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Pre-pregnancy Obesity and Maternal Nutrition: Impact on Maternal Infant Health

Union Wisconsin Room

Women who are overweight and obese at conception have a higher risk for complications during pregnancy and postpartum and their infant are at higher risk for obesity and overweight. The purpose of this research is to conduct a literature review of weight management interventions pre/interconception, during pregnancy and postpartum that have been previously tested and demonstrate evidence of their maternal/child health outcomes. Literature was retrieved through searches of scholarly health databases such as pubmed with keywords: overweight, obesity, pregnancy outcomes, pregnancy interventions, pregnancy weight gain, gestational weight gain, birth outcomes, childhood obesity and Body Mass Index (BMI). The significant publications are being synthesized and organized into summary tables. The next step is to critically identify gaps and limitations of the current literature to help formulate the research protocol. Some categories being considered in intervention outcomes include: effectiveness, retention, cultural context, cost, low income mothers, self-efficacy, individualized interventions, and BMI testing. Results thus far are demonstrating a correlation with individualized, home-based weight management interventions to improve maternal and infant outcomes. In one study, postpartum women who participated in diet interventions (one trial; n = 53; MD 1.70 kg; 95% confidence interval (CI)-2.08 to -1.32) or diet plus exercise interventions (seven trials; n+ 573; MD – 1/93 kg; 95% CI-2/96 to -0.89; random-effects, T (2) = 1.09, I(2)= 71%) lost significantly more weight than those who only took part in exercise interventions (two trials; n = 53; MD – 0.10 kg; 95% CI-2.08 to -1.32). These findings could indicate the need for weight management interventions and resources to emphasize diet as a part of standard of practice for overweight and obese pregnant women. The research could also indicate the need for healthcare providers to emphasize the importance of good pre-pregnancy nutritional health to decrease risk for poor maternal and infant outcomes.