Event Title

Quantifying the Effectiveness of Restoration Techniques between Physical Stream Characteristics and Macro Invertebrate Communities

Mentor 1

Timothy Ehlinger

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

29-4-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

29-4-2016 3:30 PM

Description

Assessing the extent of degradation and the capability of dynamic ecosystems to respond to anthropogenic stressors is a key component of ecological restoration. In order to gauge the success of environmental restoration, continual monitoring of biotic and abiotic factors must be continually evaluated. This project aims to evaluate the time response of invertebrate communities in a restored stream. Restoration of the Pike River located in Mount Pleasant, Wisconsin began in Fall 2002. Each phase of the restoration attempts to increase flood storage capacity while improving in-stream habitat for aquatic biota. As a part of this project, measurements of gravel composition, stream discharge, and invertebrate populations have been collected since the summer of 2015. Multiple samples were taken from riffle zones that vary from 3-12 years in age. These data will be analyzed to examine relationships between physical stream characteristics and invertebrate communities, while also comparing previously collected data to measure the effectiveness of restoration techniques.

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Apr 29th, 1:30 PM Apr 29th, 3:30 PM

Quantifying the Effectiveness of Restoration Techniques between Physical Stream Characteristics and Macro Invertebrate Communities

Union Wisconsin Room

Assessing the extent of degradation and the capability of dynamic ecosystems to respond to anthropogenic stressors is a key component of ecological restoration. In order to gauge the success of environmental restoration, continual monitoring of biotic and abiotic factors must be continually evaluated. This project aims to evaluate the time response of invertebrate communities in a restored stream. Restoration of the Pike River located in Mount Pleasant, Wisconsin began in Fall 2002. Each phase of the restoration attempts to increase flood storage capacity while improving in-stream habitat for aquatic biota. As a part of this project, measurements of gravel composition, stream discharge, and invertebrate populations have been collected since the summer of 2015. Multiple samples were taken from riffle zones that vary from 3-12 years in age. These data will be analyzed to examine relationships between physical stream characteristics and invertebrate communities, while also comparing previously collected data to measure the effectiveness of restoration techniques.