Event Title

Welcome to Greenwood

Mentor 1

Lyndsay Smanz

Mentor 2

Laretta Henderson

Location

Union 240

Start Date

28-4-2017 12:40 PM

Description

The Greenwood District in Tulsa, OK was the pinnacle of the American Dream. The year is 1921, segregation is the social norm, Jim Crow is synonymous with state and federal laws, and Black Americans are still second class citizens. Through all the adversity, there was hope in an 35 - square block district in the booming city of Tulsa, OK. Greenwood or famously known as Black Wall Street, was the epicenter of black economics, business, self- reliance, and the strength the black dollar possessed. It was here, in the heart of racial tension, hatred and discrimination an all-black business district thrived. Constant population growth, healthy business competition, and a vast selection of a variety of stores, gave black consumers discriminatory free shopping options.

The year is 1921, the day May 31; the day Greenwood burned. The racial tension hit its peak, and a simple touch caused an 35 -square block district to become leveled in less than 12 hours. If you do a Google search of Black Wall Street, this is the story you will get. A thriving district brought to its knees by hate, the destruction of Black Wall Street.

But I knew there had to be more. What were these businesses that ran for over a decade? Who were the owners? How did the black citizens of Tulsa live in a city that openly showed their hatred towards them? How did this district thrive successfully in the most racially tensioned part of American History? The goal of my research is to discover the businesses, community and people of the district. After discovery, I plan to make this information accessible to the public through an interactive website, okgreenwood.org.

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Apr 28th, 12:40 PM

Welcome to Greenwood

Union 240

The Greenwood District in Tulsa, OK was the pinnacle of the American Dream. The year is 1921, segregation is the social norm, Jim Crow is synonymous with state and federal laws, and Black Americans are still second class citizens. Through all the adversity, there was hope in an 35 - square block district in the booming city of Tulsa, OK. Greenwood or famously known as Black Wall Street, was the epicenter of black economics, business, self- reliance, and the strength the black dollar possessed. It was here, in the heart of racial tension, hatred and discrimination an all-black business district thrived. Constant population growth, healthy business competition, and a vast selection of a variety of stores, gave black consumers discriminatory free shopping options.

The year is 1921, the day May 31; the day Greenwood burned. The racial tension hit its peak, and a simple touch caused an 35 -square block district to become leveled in less than 12 hours. If you do a Google search of Black Wall Street, this is the story you will get. A thriving district brought to its knees by hate, the destruction of Black Wall Street.

But I knew there had to be more. What were these businesses that ran for over a decade? Who were the owners? How did the black citizens of Tulsa live in a city that openly showed their hatred towards them? How did this district thrive successfully in the most racially tensioned part of American History? The goal of my research is to discover the businesses, community and people of the district. After discovery, I plan to make this information accessible to the public through an interactive website, okgreenwood.org.