Event Title

Flow Cytometry & Optical Imaging

Mentor 1

Yongjin Sung

Location

Union 280

Start Date

28-4-2017 12:00 PM

Description

The central purpose of this research is to develop a flow system that can be incorporated into the laboratory's new optical imaging system. The lab has been developing a novel holographic method to record 3-D images of cells continuously flowing in a sub-millimeter channel. This imaging system requires a flow system to introduce cells seamlessly from the cell reservoir to the site of interrogation through a 30 micron-diameter channel. When a cell moves across the beam of light, it scatters the light according to the granulation and size. These cell characteristics can be measured without any extra contrast agents using an off-axis digital holography and with a high-speed camera. In this semester, I have designed a fixture with a V-shaped slot to allow a flow channel to run across a beam of light in the imaging flow cytometer. I am currently developing a hardware-software interface control to optimize the operating conditions such as the flow rate and cell rotation through the channel to match the data acquisition speed. Precise control of these operating conditions is essential to capturing the 3-D images of cells with high speed and accuracy. After measuring the degree of cell rotation for different flow rates, I will optimize the components and integrate them into the existing laboratory set-up. We anticipate that the flow channel developed through this research will be an essential component to successfully demonstrating the 3-D imaging capability of the system that the lab has been developing. We envision that these methods altogether will allow fast and accurate diagnosis of hematologic malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia by obviating complex sample preparation and subjective human evaluation steps.

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Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Flow Cytometry & Optical Imaging

Union 280

The central purpose of this research is to develop a flow system that can be incorporated into the laboratory's new optical imaging system. The lab has been developing a novel holographic method to record 3-D images of cells continuously flowing in a sub-millimeter channel. This imaging system requires a flow system to introduce cells seamlessly from the cell reservoir to the site of interrogation through a 30 micron-diameter channel. When a cell moves across the beam of light, it scatters the light according to the granulation and size. These cell characteristics can be measured without any extra contrast agents using an off-axis digital holography and with a high-speed camera. In this semester, I have designed a fixture with a V-shaped slot to allow a flow channel to run across a beam of light in the imaging flow cytometer. I am currently developing a hardware-software interface control to optimize the operating conditions such as the flow rate and cell rotation through the channel to match the data acquisition speed. Precise control of these operating conditions is essential to capturing the 3-D images of cells with high speed and accuracy. After measuring the degree of cell rotation for different flow rates, I will optimize the components and integrate them into the existing laboratory set-up. We anticipate that the flow channel developed through this research will be an essential component to successfully demonstrating the 3-D imaging capability of the system that the lab has been developing. We envision that these methods altogether will allow fast and accurate diagnosis of hematologic malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia by obviating complex sample preparation and subjective human evaluation steps.