Event Title

Overlay Of Thermoacoustic Images Onto Scanned Histology Slides Of Human Prostates

Mentor 1

Sarah Patch

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

TCT images of fresh surgically removed prostates are analyzed and overlaidonto histology images by matching the anatomical marks and tissue types seen on both, histology and TCT. Overlay of different cases will allow for comparing and illustrating how cancer regions show up on thegreyscale-TCT images. TCT pulses were generated by using electromagnetic waves to heat up the prostate which was immersed in a highly electrolytic solution and emissions were detected using an ultrasound transducer connected to a Verasonics ultrasound system. A set of TCT images was produced for each prostate. Each image showing the TCT data for one axial level with the thickness of 3mm. After obtaining the TCT images, the prostate was sent to MCW to be cut up into axial slices of 3mm and fixed onto microscope slides. Histology slides were scanned in using an image scanner to create digital copies which were used in the overlay. Overlay of images involved creating a 3D structure using the 3DSlicer software where TCT images were combined. Utilization of the 3D visualization along with viewing the physical histology slides under the microscope, and under the supervision and directions of the pathologist David Hull, MD, histology levels were oriented and processed to match to corresponding TCT images. Some of the aspects taken into consideration included but were not limited to: brightness of tissue on TCT (reflecting ion concentration), anatomical marks, edges of prostate after trimming out the adipose tissue, and cancer regions seen on histology. Overlay is in its final stages. In order to avoid errors final conclusions will be made when all sets have been overlaid and compared. Initially, overlaying one case would take a long time and often times cases needed to be redone due to lack of back ground info. However, now after doing more than 10 cases and learning a great deal from Dr. Hull, overlaying is much more efficient and errors are minimized.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Overlay Of Thermoacoustic Images Onto Scanned Histology Slides Of Human Prostates

Union Wisconsin Room

TCT images of fresh surgically removed prostates are analyzed and overlaidonto histology images by matching the anatomical marks and tissue types seen on both, histology and TCT. Overlay of different cases will allow for comparing and illustrating how cancer regions show up on thegreyscale-TCT images. TCT pulses were generated by using electromagnetic waves to heat up the prostate which was immersed in a highly electrolytic solution and emissions were detected using an ultrasound transducer connected to a Verasonics ultrasound system. A set of TCT images was produced for each prostate. Each image showing the TCT data for one axial level with the thickness of 3mm. After obtaining the TCT images, the prostate was sent to MCW to be cut up into axial slices of 3mm and fixed onto microscope slides. Histology slides were scanned in using an image scanner to create digital copies which were used in the overlay. Overlay of images involved creating a 3D structure using the 3DSlicer software where TCT images were combined. Utilization of the 3D visualization along with viewing the physical histology slides under the microscope, and under the supervision and directions of the pathologist David Hull, MD, histology levels were oriented and processed to match to corresponding TCT images. Some of the aspects taken into consideration included but were not limited to: brightness of tissue on TCT (reflecting ion concentration), anatomical marks, edges of prostate after trimming out the adipose tissue, and cancer regions seen on histology. Overlay is in its final stages. In order to avoid errors final conclusions will be made when all sets have been overlaid and compared. Initially, overlaying one case would take a long time and often times cases needed to be redone due to lack of back ground info. However, now after doing more than 10 cases and learning a great deal from Dr. Hull, overlaying is much more efficient and errors are minimized.