Event Title

A Review of Technologies for Detection of Zika Virus

Mentor 1

Marcia Silva

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito- borne flavivirus with a single-stranded positive RNA and is transmitted by many Aedes spp. mosquitoes. It was first identified in monkeys in Uganda in 1947. The first human case was detected in Nigeria in 1954 and there have been further outbreaks in Africa, South East Asia and the Pacific Islands. Most of these outbreaks were small and Zika has not previously been considered a major threat to human health until May 2015, when it was reported in Brazil and has since spread rapidly, being considered a "pandemic re-emergence" by the US National Institute of Health (NIH). This work will present a review of technologies for detection of zika virus, including standard serological approaches, nucleic acid-based detection methods, and methods that fall under "rapid" detection methods. We will mostly focus on the rapid detection methods as the recent Zika virus outbreak highlights the need for low-cost diagnostics that can be rapidly developed for distribution and use in pandemic regions. They can be classified in three categories: (a) programmable RNA sensors called toehold switches, (b) freeze-dried, paper-based, cell-free protein expression platform, and (c) a combination of these two technologies generating a technology platform for rapidly and inexpensively developing and deploying diagnostic sensors.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

A Review of Technologies for Detection of Zika Virus

Union Wisconsin Room

Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito- borne flavivirus with a single-stranded positive RNA and is transmitted by many Aedes spp. mosquitoes. It was first identified in monkeys in Uganda in 1947. The first human case was detected in Nigeria in 1954 and there have been further outbreaks in Africa, South East Asia and the Pacific Islands. Most of these outbreaks were small and Zika has not previously been considered a major threat to human health until May 2015, when it was reported in Brazil and has since spread rapidly, being considered a "pandemic re-emergence" by the US National Institute of Health (NIH). This work will present a review of technologies for detection of zika virus, including standard serological approaches, nucleic acid-based detection methods, and methods that fall under "rapid" detection methods. We will mostly focus on the rapid detection methods as the recent Zika virus outbreak highlights the need for low-cost diagnostics that can be rapidly developed for distribution and use in pandemic regions. They can be classified in three categories: (a) programmable RNA sensors called toehold switches, (b) freeze-dried, paper-based, cell-free protein expression platform, and (c) a combination of these two technologies generating a technology platform for rapidly and inexpensively developing and deploying diagnostic sensors.