Event Title

Infant Mortality: A Literature Review

Mentor 1

Victoria Moerchen

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

Infant mortality is a public health problem in the United States and is predominantly found in African American families. Studies suggest reducing stress on African American women while pregnant may have a positive impact on birth outcomes. African American fathers may have a positive influence on stress reduction by engaging in the prenatal period. This poster demonstrates the usefulness of community-based participatory research in learning more about the experiences of African American fathers living in an urban center in the Midwest. A community-based participatory research study using phenomenology and focus group interviews was used for this study. A community-based approach includes individuals who are affected by an issue and develops strategies to resolve or to assist in understanding said issue. These interviews consisted of 45 fathers participating in four group interviews and one member-checking group. Community organizations were given the flexibility to utilize strategies to recruit and engage the participants in the focus group interviews. Results show that fathers in the study revealed multiple factors that inhibit their identity, performance, and engagement during the prenatal period. These include no transportation, no means of communication, and no means of work. Eliminating these factors lead to more father engagement and increased their overall knowledge of infant mortality. Allowing community organizations to determine optimal methods for recruiting and engaging fathers resulted in significant participation. Providing incentives that match the organizations’ services for the fathers such as transportation, food, and means of communications such as a temporary phone, resulted in increased father engagement for this study. More engagement in the prenatal period from fathers can help decrease stress on the mothers—making it possible for infant mortality to decrease.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Infant Mortality: A Literature Review

Union Wisconsin Room

Infant mortality is a public health problem in the United States and is predominantly found in African American families. Studies suggest reducing stress on African American women while pregnant may have a positive impact on birth outcomes. African American fathers may have a positive influence on stress reduction by engaging in the prenatal period. This poster demonstrates the usefulness of community-based participatory research in learning more about the experiences of African American fathers living in an urban center in the Midwest. A community-based participatory research study using phenomenology and focus group interviews was used for this study. A community-based approach includes individuals who are affected by an issue and develops strategies to resolve or to assist in understanding said issue. These interviews consisted of 45 fathers participating in four group interviews and one member-checking group. Community organizations were given the flexibility to utilize strategies to recruit and engage the participants in the focus group interviews. Results show that fathers in the study revealed multiple factors that inhibit their identity, performance, and engagement during the prenatal period. These include no transportation, no means of communication, and no means of work. Eliminating these factors lead to more father engagement and increased their overall knowledge of infant mortality. Allowing community organizations to determine optimal methods for recruiting and engaging fathers resulted in significant participation. Providing incentives that match the organizations’ services for the fathers such as transportation, food, and means of communications such as a temporary phone, resulted in increased father engagement for this study. More engagement in the prenatal period from fathers can help decrease stress on the mothers—making it possible for infant mortality to decrease.