Event Title

Novel Macroporous Material for the Removal of Mercury from Water

Mentor 1

Marcia Silva

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

Under the 1987 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, the lower Green Bay and Fox River estuary has been labeled an Area of Concern due to mercury contamination from over-industrialization. Mercury attaches onto sediment and is introduced into the water column where it can either be buried along with the sediment, resuspended in the water, or methylated by bacteria. The result of methylation is a bioaccumulative organic compound known as methylmercury. This release of mercury into the region has led to environmental concerns due to its high toxicity, which is dependent on the chemical form and type of exposure. Three primary forms of mercury are: elemental mercury, inorganic, and organic compounds. Each form is present in the atmosphere and can be deposited into surface waters. Current mercury remediation attempts include coagulation, Granular Activated Carbon, Lime Softening, and Reverse Osmosis. While all have proven to remove mercury with various degrees of success, issues remain about cost, eco-friendliness, and effectiveness. To provide a more efficient, affordable solution for the removal of mercury, the adsorption properties of the novel macroporous material were evaluated. This research studies the effectiveness of a novel macroporous material for the removal of mercury from water. The material was tested in column experiments by spiking it with a range of mercury contamination levels indicative of conditions found in the sediments in Green Bay. Water samples were collected from contaminated sediments to analyze and to assess the new materials' performance. Preliminary column experiments indicate removal of up to 100 % of mercury from the water column.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Novel Macroporous Material for the Removal of Mercury from Water

Union Wisconsin Room

Under the 1987 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, the lower Green Bay and Fox River estuary has been labeled an Area of Concern due to mercury contamination from over-industrialization. Mercury attaches onto sediment and is introduced into the water column where it can either be buried along with the sediment, resuspended in the water, or methylated by bacteria. The result of methylation is a bioaccumulative organic compound known as methylmercury. This release of mercury into the region has led to environmental concerns due to its high toxicity, which is dependent on the chemical form and type of exposure. Three primary forms of mercury are: elemental mercury, inorganic, and organic compounds. Each form is present in the atmosphere and can be deposited into surface waters. Current mercury remediation attempts include coagulation, Granular Activated Carbon, Lime Softening, and Reverse Osmosis. While all have proven to remove mercury with various degrees of success, issues remain about cost, eco-friendliness, and effectiveness. To provide a more efficient, affordable solution for the removal of mercury, the adsorption properties of the novel macroporous material were evaluated. This research studies the effectiveness of a novel macroporous material for the removal of mercury from water. The material was tested in column experiments by spiking it with a range of mercury contamination levels indicative of conditions found in the sediments in Green Bay. Water samples were collected from contaminated sediments to analyze and to assess the new materials' performance. Preliminary column experiments indicate removal of up to 100 % of mercury from the water column.