Event Title

A Comparison Study of Natural and Engineered Porous Material Ability for Bacteria Retention and Removal From Water

Mentor 1

Marcia Silva

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

The most common of waterborne pathogens are bacteria which enter water with waste: from untreated raw sewage, large scale animal operations, seagulls and pet waste. People can become ill from swimming in or drinking contaminated water. Drinking water filtration, aside from billions of dollars in upfront cost, can expense a city upwards of $400 million per year to operate. This research seeks to examine an innovative method for removing bacteria from water to lower expense of pretreating drinking water. Engineered porous material has shown high affinity for removing various pollutants. Natural and engineered porous material will be evaluated through column experiments. Different loads of bacteria E. coli will be added to the column to examine the ability of the media for bacterial retention. We expect engineered porous material to have a higher ability to retain and remove bacteria from water.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

A Comparison Study of Natural and Engineered Porous Material Ability for Bacteria Retention and Removal From Water

Union Wisconsin Room

The most common of waterborne pathogens are bacteria which enter water with waste: from untreated raw sewage, large scale animal operations, seagulls and pet waste. People can become ill from swimming in or drinking contaminated water. Drinking water filtration, aside from billions of dollars in upfront cost, can expense a city upwards of $400 million per year to operate. This research seeks to examine an innovative method for removing bacteria from water to lower expense of pretreating drinking water. Engineered porous material has shown high affinity for removing various pollutants. Natural and engineered porous material will be evaluated through column experiments. Different loads of bacteria E. coli will be added to the column to examine the ability of the media for bacterial retention. We expect engineered porous material to have a higher ability to retain and remove bacteria from water.