Event Title

Kinematics of Activities of Daily Living in Patients with a Rotator Cuff Tear

Mentor 1

Brooke Slavens

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

Current research on rotator cuff tears, specifically supraspinatus tears, and post-operative rehabilitation insufficiently discusses kinematics during activities of daily living (ADLs). Kinematics is important for understanding how an individual may compensate with their injured arm preoperatively, which will direct post-operative rehabilitation. The purpose of this research was to examine the kinematics of an individual's injured and non-injured arm to better understand how one may compensate with their injured arm due to a rotator cuff tear. The ADL task evaluated was combing hair. A 15 camera Vicon T-Series Motion Capture System was used to gather kinematic data of the participant performing three trials of the combing hair task with each arm. The average (standard deviation) peak joint angles and joint range of motion (ROM) in the coronal plane were calculated for the shoulder joint. The average peak abduction was 78.99° (±1.31° ) for the non-injured arm and 69.65° (±2.91° ) for the injured arm. The average coronal plane ROM was 69.94° (±2.74° ) for the non-injured arm and 50.52° (71°) for the injured arm. The non-injured arm was more abducted throughout the entire task. The injured arm is performing the task differently from the non-injured arm due to the supraspinatus tear. With these findings, rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery may be improved by understanding how an individual compensates with their injured arm prior to surgical repair. This is significant because after surgery, it is expected that the compensation would be reduced. If compensation is not reduced, therapists may use strategies to target the affected areas. Reducing compensatory motions will allow an individual to return to their functional ability before injury.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Kinematics of Activities of Daily Living in Patients with a Rotator Cuff Tear

Union Wisconsin Room

Current research on rotator cuff tears, specifically supraspinatus tears, and post-operative rehabilitation insufficiently discusses kinematics during activities of daily living (ADLs). Kinematics is important for understanding how an individual may compensate with their injured arm preoperatively, which will direct post-operative rehabilitation. The purpose of this research was to examine the kinematics of an individual's injured and non-injured arm to better understand how one may compensate with their injured arm due to a rotator cuff tear. The ADL task evaluated was combing hair. A 15 camera Vicon T-Series Motion Capture System was used to gather kinematic data of the participant performing three trials of the combing hair task with each arm. The average (standard deviation) peak joint angles and joint range of motion (ROM) in the coronal plane were calculated for the shoulder joint. The average peak abduction was 78.99° (±1.31° ) for the non-injured arm and 69.65° (±2.91° ) for the injured arm. The average coronal plane ROM was 69.94° (±2.74° ) for the non-injured arm and 50.52° (71°) for the injured arm. The non-injured arm was more abducted throughout the entire task. The injured arm is performing the task differently from the non-injured arm due to the supraspinatus tear. With these findings, rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair surgery may be improved by understanding how an individual compensates with their injured arm prior to surgical repair. This is significant because after surgery, it is expected that the compensation would be reduced. If compensation is not reduced, therapists may use strategies to target the affected areas. Reducing compensatory motions will allow an individual to return to their functional ability before injury.