Event Title

Reliability of a Lab-Based Measure of Response Inhibition in Youth with Williams Syndrome

Mentor 1

Dr. Bonita Klein-Tasman

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

28-4-2017 1:30 PM

End Date

28-4-2017 4:00 PM

Description

Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by poor response inhibition (RI; the ability to suppress behavior). There have been no examinations of the reliability of lab-based measures of RI for WS. The purpose of the current study was to determine the reliability of commission errors from the Go/No-Go task (a measure of RI) in a sample of youth with WS. Twenty-two youth with WS (ages 10-17) participated in a pilot study of a computerized intervention aimed at improving RI. Participants completed a computer-based Go/No-Go (GNG) task at baseline and after 5-7 weeks of either treatment or waiting, with commission errors (CE; incorrect No-Go trials) used to measure RI. Performance was examined for each quarter of a testing session (240 total trials; Q1=trial 1-59). For reliability analysis, 1-3 participants with high studentized residuals were excluded from each correlation. GNG CE for the entire sample (n=22) at baseline was significantly correlated between the first two quarters of the task (r=.593, p=.006), with all the other correlations between quarters significant with somewhat larger effect sizes (r’s=.78-.907, p’s<.001). GNG CE for the wait-list group (n=12) across the baseline and post-wait assessments demonstrated adequate test-retest reliability for the third quarter of the task (r=.747, p=.008), and poor (Q1 r=.538, p=.09; Q2 r=.551, p=.1) to very poor test-retest reliability (Q4 r=.158, p=.66) for the other quarters. Commission errors from the third quarter of the Go/No-Go task appeared to have the strongest test-retest reliability and appeared to predict performance of the other quarters relatively well for this sample of youth with WS. Obtaining a reliable score is important for measuring response inhibition in WS and for determining suitable measurement endpoints for randomized controlled trials. Future research should investigate the validity of Go/No-Go commission errors for measuring inhibition in everyday contexts in WS.

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Apr 28th, 1:30 PM Apr 28th, 4:00 PM

Reliability of a Lab-Based Measure of Response Inhibition in Youth with Williams Syndrome

Union Wisconsin Room

Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized by poor response inhibition (RI; the ability to suppress behavior). There have been no examinations of the reliability of lab-based measures of RI for WS. The purpose of the current study was to determine the reliability of commission errors from the Go/No-Go task (a measure of RI) in a sample of youth with WS. Twenty-two youth with WS (ages 10-17) participated in a pilot study of a computerized intervention aimed at improving RI. Participants completed a computer-based Go/No-Go (GNG) task at baseline and after 5-7 weeks of either treatment or waiting, with commission errors (CE; incorrect No-Go trials) used to measure RI. Performance was examined for each quarter of a testing session (240 total trials; Q1=trial 1-59). For reliability analysis, 1-3 participants with high studentized residuals were excluded from each correlation. GNG CE for the entire sample (n=22) at baseline was significantly correlated between the first two quarters of the task (r=.593, p=.006), with all the other correlations between quarters significant with somewhat larger effect sizes (r’s=.78-.907, p’s<.001). GNG CE for the wait-list group (n=12) across the baseline and post-wait assessments demonstrated adequate test-retest reliability for the third quarter of the task (r=.747, p=.008), and poor (Q1 r=.538, p=.09; Q2 r=.551, p=.1) to very poor test-retest reliability (Q4 r=.158, p=.66) for the other quarters. Commission errors from the third quarter of the Go/No-Go task appeared to have the strongest test-retest reliability and appeared to predict performance of the other quarters relatively well for this sample of youth with WS. Obtaining a reliable score is important for measuring response inhibition in WS and for determining suitable measurement endpoints for randomized controlled trials. Future research should investigate the validity of Go/No-Go commission errors for measuring inhibition in everyday contexts in WS.