Event Title

CAN YOUR DAILY COMMUTE SLOW CLIMATE CHANGE?

Presenter Information

Mikael Luter

Mentor 1

Itziar Lazkano

Location

Union 250

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:20 PM

Description

Is it possible for Americans to reduce their daily pollution? Greenhouse gas emissions worldwide have increased drastically in the last 50 years. The transportation sector is the second largest emitter of carbon accounting for 27% of all GHG emissions. Cars, trucks, and busses emit 83% of all transportation emissions and, given that the average American spends 26 minutes in travel to work, it is urgent that we move toward cleaner transportation alternatives. Using data on fuel emission and consumption, we analyze taxes and regulations that might effectively reduce GHG emissions from the daily commute. Specifically, we examine several plausible systems that have led to a substantial reduction in transportation emissions – China has added more road space and made public transit systems more abundant/accessible; the rideshare/carshare market is booming in the UK; and several countries have implemented a carbon tax system. Which is the best alternative for the US? What can we learn from data on emissions, fuel consumptions, and drive times? Everyday Americans can use this information as motivation for a transition to a cleaner, more efficient carbon footprint, ultimately encouraging policy makers to adjust legislation to reflect the shift in American values.

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Apr 27th, 12:20 PM

CAN YOUR DAILY COMMUTE SLOW CLIMATE CHANGE?

Union 250

Is it possible for Americans to reduce their daily pollution? Greenhouse gas emissions worldwide have increased drastically in the last 50 years. The transportation sector is the second largest emitter of carbon accounting for 27% of all GHG emissions. Cars, trucks, and busses emit 83% of all transportation emissions and, given that the average American spends 26 minutes in travel to work, it is urgent that we move toward cleaner transportation alternatives. Using data on fuel emission and consumption, we analyze taxes and regulations that might effectively reduce GHG emissions from the daily commute. Specifically, we examine several plausible systems that have led to a substantial reduction in transportation emissions – China has added more road space and made public transit systems more abundant/accessible; the rideshare/carshare market is booming in the UK; and several countries have implemented a carbon tax system. Which is the best alternative for the US? What can we learn from data on emissions, fuel consumptions, and drive times? Everyday Americans can use this information as motivation for a transition to a cleaner, more efficient carbon footprint, ultimately encouraging policy makers to adjust legislation to reflect the shift in American values.