Event Title

How Brazilian Municipalities Have Responded to Domestic violence

Presenter Information

Samuel Orlowski
Tasha Wade

Mentor 1

Natasha Sugiyama

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Women in Brazil have suffered from domestic violence for a long time but have made great strides as a nation moving closer towards gender equality. A law in particular was an important step for women's rights in Brazil that is named after a women's rights activist who's husband tried to murder her twice, leaving her paraplegic. The Maria da Penha law was made to reduce violence against women in Brazil. The law also increased the punishment for those who commit domestic violence, created processes of removing the abuser from the home, and has the potential to issue restraining orders against offenders. The law was implemented in 2006 which leads to the question of how have Brazilian municipalities responded to the issue of domestic violence? While the law is national, the numerous resources that provide information and support to women are decided by local municipalities themselves. Brazilian municipality decisions on wether or not to provide these services are affected by many factors such as the political affiliation of the gubernatorial leadership, presence of women’s rights groups, existence of a women’s council, and their state capacity. Based on interviews of civil society and municipal leaders I found that civil society is an important aspect of women’s rights because providing access to information to these women get them more involved, which can contribute to more resources being allocated to women's issues within the municipality. I also found that councils are important because they allow women to participate and provide local knowledge of the situation providing the councils the information they need to make real changes in these women’s lives. State capacity was significant but showed that economic wealth doesn't necessarily mean that the municipality is adequately providing for those suffering domestic abuse.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

How Brazilian Municipalities Have Responded to Domestic violence

Union Wisconsin Room

Women in Brazil have suffered from domestic violence for a long time but have made great strides as a nation moving closer towards gender equality. A law in particular was an important step for women's rights in Brazil that is named after a women's rights activist who's husband tried to murder her twice, leaving her paraplegic. The Maria da Penha law was made to reduce violence against women in Brazil. The law also increased the punishment for those who commit domestic violence, created processes of removing the abuser from the home, and has the potential to issue restraining orders against offenders. The law was implemented in 2006 which leads to the question of how have Brazilian municipalities responded to the issue of domestic violence? While the law is national, the numerous resources that provide information and support to women are decided by local municipalities themselves. Brazilian municipality decisions on wether or not to provide these services are affected by many factors such as the political affiliation of the gubernatorial leadership, presence of women’s rights groups, existence of a women’s council, and their state capacity. Based on interviews of civil society and municipal leaders I found that civil society is an important aspect of women’s rights because providing access to information to these women get them more involved, which can contribute to more resources being allocated to women's issues within the municipality. I also found that councils are important because they allow women to participate and provide local knowledge of the situation providing the councils the information they need to make real changes in these women’s lives. State capacity was significant but showed that economic wealth doesn't necessarily mean that the municipality is adequately providing for those suffering domestic abuse.