Event Title

Development of a Real-Time Process Monitor: Spectrophotometric Characterization of Novel Metal-Binding Chemosensor Dyes.

Presenter Information

Garrett Finn

Mentor 1

J. Aldstadt

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets strict standards for various metals such as copper, zinc and lead in industrial wastewater. To be in compliance with these regulations, the "over-treatment" of industrial effluent is typically practiced. Over-treatment results in increased operating costs, as well as environmental impacts. Current at-line and off-line monitoring methods are unable to provide adequate information to meet more efficient, real-time adjustments that are needed for the treatment of wastewater. Given the limitations of current monitoring methods based on spectrophotometry, we are studying the analytical utility of new long-lasting sensor dyes developed by the Schwabacher Group at UWM. By characterizing these novel chemosensor dyes, a real-time process monitor for industrial effluent can be potentially be designed and tested. In my project, I am studying the acid-base properties of these dyes, as well as their binding affinity for the cations of interest (e.g., zinc, lead, and chromium) so that a quantitative model can be further developed and optimized. I am employing a method that is based upon using a high-resolution optical fiber-based (visible) spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector for the selective and sensitive characterization of the dye:metal interaction.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Development of a Real-Time Process Monitor: Spectrophotometric Characterization of Novel Metal-Binding Chemosensor Dyes.

Union Wisconsin Room

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sets strict standards for various metals such as copper, zinc and lead in industrial wastewater. To be in compliance with these regulations, the "over-treatment" of industrial effluent is typically practiced. Over-treatment results in increased operating costs, as well as environmental impacts. Current at-line and off-line monitoring methods are unable to provide adequate information to meet more efficient, real-time adjustments that are needed for the treatment of wastewater. Given the limitations of current monitoring methods based on spectrophotometry, we are studying the analytical utility of new long-lasting sensor dyes developed by the Schwabacher Group at UWM. By characterizing these novel chemosensor dyes, a real-time process monitor for industrial effluent can be potentially be designed and tested. In my project, I am studying the acid-base properties of these dyes, as well as their binding affinity for the cations of interest (e.g., zinc, lead, and chromium) so that a quantitative model can be further developed and optimized. I am employing a method that is based upon using a high-resolution optical fiber-based (visible) spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector for the selective and sensitive characterization of the dye:metal interaction.