Event Title

A Systematic Comparison of Two Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Individuals with Upper-Limb Musculoskeletal Disorders

Presenter Information

Danielle Hobach
Vanessa Bravo

Mentor 1

Bhagwant Sindhu

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

The rotator cuff is composed of four muscles: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. Rotator cuffs are at increased risk for tearing due to genetics, frequent overhead activity, and age-related degeneration. Rotator cuff tears come along with lengthy rehabilitation times causing barriers in performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and resulting in psychological distress. Mindfulness is a strategy that helps reduce psychological distress by achieving a mental state of awareness in the present moment. Mindfulness means an individual accepts their own thoughts, feelings and bodily sensations without judgment. Current evidence suggests that mindfulness-based interventions support an individual in self-management of pain and associated psychological distress, which may present as a mental health disorder, in patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions, such as rotator cuff tears. The purpose of the study will be to determine similarities and differences between two mindfulness interventions: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Headspace. MBSR has been described as "a group program that focuses upon the progressive acquisition of mindfulness." In contrast, Headspace is a mobile application that provides guided meditation for individuals to achieve a stable mental state. As part of this study, we will conduct a critical review of literature, which will help us acquire knowledge on how we can apply Headspace or MBSR to individuals who have undergone rotator cuff repair. We will examine the training required, time for training, access to intervention, ease of use of intervention, and cost of intervention. Our findings of the critical review of literature will be reported at UWM's Undergraduate Reasearch Symposium.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

A Systematic Comparison of Two Mindfulness-Based Interventions for Individuals with Upper-Limb Musculoskeletal Disorders

Union Wisconsin Room

The rotator cuff is composed of four muscles: supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. Rotator cuffs are at increased risk for tearing due to genetics, frequent overhead activity, and age-related degeneration. Rotator cuff tears come along with lengthy rehabilitation times causing barriers in performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs), and resulting in psychological distress. Mindfulness is a strategy that helps reduce psychological distress by achieving a mental state of awareness in the present moment. Mindfulness means an individual accepts their own thoughts, feelings and bodily sensations without judgment. Current evidence suggests that mindfulness-based interventions support an individual in self-management of pain and associated psychological distress, which may present as a mental health disorder, in patients with chronic musculoskeletal conditions, such as rotator cuff tears. The purpose of the study will be to determine similarities and differences between two mindfulness interventions: Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Headspace. MBSR has been described as "a group program that focuses upon the progressive acquisition of mindfulness." In contrast, Headspace is a mobile application that provides guided meditation for individuals to achieve a stable mental state. As part of this study, we will conduct a critical review of literature, which will help us acquire knowledge on how we can apply Headspace or MBSR to individuals who have undergone rotator cuff repair. We will examine the training required, time for training, access to intervention, ease of use of intervention, and cost of intervention. Our findings of the critical review of literature will be reported at UWM's Undergraduate Reasearch Symposium.