Event Title

Fabrication of optically transparent nanofluidic channels for single molecule tracking

Presenter Information

HUY JU MUN

Mentor 1

Jorg Woehl

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

"Nanofluidics" can be defined as the study of the behavior, manipulation and control of fluids confined in nanoscale structures in physics and as the design and fabrication of nanostructures involving the controlled movement of fluids in technology. My research purpose is to fabricate an optically transparent nanoscale channel with PDMS walls (polydimethylsiloxane, the most widely used silicon-based organic polymer). This is done by plasma “etching,” or modifying the physical properties of the target by plasma, and analyzing interference pattenrs to determine the flatness of the channel. Previously SU-8 (originally developed as a photoresist for the microelectronics industry) was used to produce the channel, with the purpose of casting a thinner channel, however, the wall material of the channel was amended to PDMS. Manufacturing thin channels ensures that particles remian within the range of focus, allowing one specific molecule to be clearly examined. To fabricate the channel, oxygen plasma etching was introduced. The flatness of the channel was calculated under monochronic lights (which have a specific wavelength and frequency) with a principle of light interference, especially Newton's Ring and Air Edges, then the thickness of the channel was accurately measured by 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy. I have succeeded in constructing a nanoscale channel with PDMS by oxygen plasma etching and am still working on studying the efficient etching time for the channel and analyzing the precise roughness of the channels. The ultimate objective of this research is improving technology for the tracking and trapping of micro- or nanoparticles in a micro/nanofluidic device. This research, which is dealing with manipulating nanoparticles, would significant impact the biomedical device industry, biotechnology, physical chemistry research and “lab-on-a-chip” research.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Fabrication of optically transparent nanofluidic channels for single molecule tracking

Union Wisconsin Room

"Nanofluidics" can be defined as the study of the behavior, manipulation and control of fluids confined in nanoscale structures in physics and as the design and fabrication of nanostructures involving the controlled movement of fluids in technology. My research purpose is to fabricate an optically transparent nanoscale channel with PDMS walls (polydimethylsiloxane, the most widely used silicon-based organic polymer). This is done by plasma “etching,” or modifying the physical properties of the target by plasma, and analyzing interference pattenrs to determine the flatness of the channel. Previously SU-8 (originally developed as a photoresist for the microelectronics industry) was used to produce the channel, with the purpose of casting a thinner channel, however, the wall material of the channel was amended to PDMS. Manufacturing thin channels ensures that particles remian within the range of focus, allowing one specific molecule to be clearly examined. To fabricate the channel, oxygen plasma etching was introduced. The flatness of the channel was calculated under monochronic lights (which have a specific wavelength and frequency) with a principle of light interference, especially Newton's Ring and Air Edges, then the thickness of the channel was accurately measured by 3D confocal laser scanning microscopy. I have succeeded in constructing a nanoscale channel with PDMS by oxygen plasma etching and am still working on studying the efficient etching time for the channel and analyzing the precise roughness of the channels. The ultimate objective of this research is improving technology for the tracking and trapping of micro- or nanoparticles in a micro/nanofluidic device. This research, which is dealing with manipulating nanoparticles, would significant impact the biomedical device industry, biotechnology, physical chemistry research and “lab-on-a-chip” research.