Event Title

Exploratory Study of Eye Care Needs of Adults in S. E. Wisconsin: Community Scan and Needs Assessment

Presenter Information

Eugene Cherry

Mentor 1

Sandra Millon-Underwood

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Purpose and Background/Significance
Diabetes, a complex chronic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, affects one-third of the population in the U. S. The NIH Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases report that 29. 1 million Americans are living with diabetes and 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes. Diabetes is a serious health concern that if left untreated could cause many long-term complications. Complications that could result from untreated diabetes include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes which could lead to permanent blindness.

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of acquired blindness among working-age adults in the U. S. DR affects all population groups. The burden of DR has been noted to be higher for racial/ethnic minorities than for Whites. Tight glycemic control and routine eye screening can diminish the public health impact of DR. However, data reveal that racial/ethnic minority patients are more likely to have poorer glycemic control and are less likely to be screened for DR than Whites.

Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of DR can protect against vision loss. Identifying men and women at risk-for vision loss due to DR is a national health concern. However, few efforts have been undertaken in local communities to identify populations in the greatest need of screening, diagnostics and treatment. An exploratory study of the eye health concerns, eye health risks and eye care needs of adults in S. E. Wisconsin's inner city was therefore undertaken.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Exploratory Study of Eye Care Needs of Adults in S. E. Wisconsin: Community Scan and Needs Assessment

Union Wisconsin Room

Purpose and Background/Significance
Diabetes, a complex chronic disease characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, affects one-third of the population in the U. S. The NIH Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases report that 29. 1 million Americans are living with diabetes and 86 million Americans have pre-diabetes. Diabetes is a serious health concern that if left untreated could cause many long-term complications. Complications that could result from untreated diabetes include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes which could lead to permanent blindness.

Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common microvascular complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of acquired blindness among working-age adults in the U. S. DR affects all population groups. The burden of DR has been noted to be higher for racial/ethnic minorities than for Whites. Tight glycemic control and routine eye screening can diminish the public health impact of DR. However, data reveal that racial/ethnic minority patients are more likely to have poorer glycemic control and are less likely to be screened for DR than Whites.

Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of DR can protect against vision loss. Identifying men and women at risk-for vision loss due to DR is a national health concern. However, few efforts have been undertaken in local communities to identify populations in the greatest need of screening, diagnostics and treatment. An exploratory study of the eye health concerns, eye health risks and eye care needs of adults in S. E. Wisconsin's inner city was therefore undertaken.