Event Title

Characterizing Balance in Children with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) Using Bertec Balance Advantage

Presenter Information

Kathryn Tercher

Mentor 1

Alyssa Schnorenberg

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Balance, an essential part of daily activities, requires complex coordination of the central nervous system and musculoskeletal system to maintain the body’s center of gravity within its base of support. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a genetic connective tissue disorder with hypermobile type (hEDS) as one of the most disabling forms with respect to musculoskeletal function. hEDS is associated with joint hypermobility and instability, which make balancing during even simple daily tasks such as walking or stair climbing difficult or painful, significantly impacting quality of life. However, there is a lack of research that addresses how and to what extent balance is affected by hEDS. This study will investigate balance in children with hEDS.

Three children between the ages of 8 and 18 will undergo a balance assessment using a Bertec Balance Advantage – Dynamic CDP system. Specifically, the Motor Control Test (MCT) will be completed, in which a subject tries to maintain balance while standing on a force plate that translates one-half, one, or two inch(es) in either the backwards and forwards direction. Data will be collected regarding the subject’s latency, or their reaction time (ms) to the translation. Since the reaction is an involuntary response, the results will provide information on the autonomic component of postural control. The data will be compared to healthy controls within the Bertec system database (age-, weight-, height-, gender- matched) to find statistical differences indicating an issue in their central nervous system affecting latency. We expect to see an increase in latency time in the hEDS subjects due to their associated balance issues as compared to the healthy subjects. The information found in this study may be helpful for future diagnostics and therapeutic planning in clinical practice.

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Characterizing Balance in Children with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) Using Bertec Balance Advantage

Union Wisconsin Room

Balance, an essential part of daily activities, requires complex coordination of the central nervous system and musculoskeletal system to maintain the body’s center of gravity within its base of support. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a genetic connective tissue disorder with hypermobile type (hEDS) as one of the most disabling forms with respect to musculoskeletal function. hEDS is associated with joint hypermobility and instability, which make balancing during even simple daily tasks such as walking or stair climbing difficult or painful, significantly impacting quality of life. However, there is a lack of research that addresses how and to what extent balance is affected by hEDS. This study will investigate balance in children with hEDS.

Three children between the ages of 8 and 18 will undergo a balance assessment using a Bertec Balance Advantage – Dynamic CDP system. Specifically, the Motor Control Test (MCT) will be completed, in which a subject tries to maintain balance while standing on a force plate that translates one-half, one, or two inch(es) in either the backwards and forwards direction. Data will be collected regarding the subject’s latency, or their reaction time (ms) to the translation. Since the reaction is an involuntary response, the results will provide information on the autonomic component of postural control. The data will be compared to healthy controls within the Bertec system database (age-, weight-, height-, gender- matched) to find statistical differences indicating an issue in their central nervous system affecting latency. We expect to see an increase in latency time in the hEDS subjects due to their associated balance issues as compared to the healthy subjects. The information found in this study may be helpful for future diagnostics and therapeutic planning in clinical practice.