Event Title

Effects of Simple Motor Movement on Physiological Activity

Mentor 1

Ray Fleming

Mentor 2

Alese M. Nelson

Location

Union Wisconsin Room

Start Date

27-4-2018 1:00 PM

Description

Emotion regulation refers to one’s ability to adapt and regulate emotional responses to situational demands. These adaptive and regulatory patterns vary depending on individual and contextual differences. For example, slow finger-tapping reduces physiological arousal produced by stressful stimuli. The present study was conducted to determine whether rhythmic movement of fingers, tactile feedback from tapping, or combination of the two will produce the reduction in stress. Participants begin by completing measures including the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Next, participants are fitted with physiological equipment to measure electrocardiogram (ECG), respiration, and skin conductance levels. A 5-minute resting baseline is recorded, followed by presentation of images intended to induce stress. After the first presentation of images, participants complete the PANAS for a second time and are randomly assigned to one of seven finger-tapping conditions. These include: (1) control - no tapping, (2) steady tapping on a flat surface, (3) steady tapping finger movements in the air, (4) steadily being tapped by a device (5) slow tapping on a flat surface, (6) slow tapping finger movements in the air, and (7) being tapped slowly by a device. Participants then complete a 10-minute training on how to tap in accordance with their assigned condition. Following training, participants view a second set of images (while tapping throughout) followed by a third completion of the PANAS. A final 5-minute physiological baseline is then recorded, followed by debriefing. During the second (post-training) set of images, all steady tapping conditions are expected to produce greater sympathetic activity (indexed by heart rate variability) compared to controls. Compared to steady tapping and controls, greater parasympathetic activity is expected for all slow tapping conditions. Greater parasympathetic activity is expected for participants being tapped slowly by the device (Condition 7) than for participants slowly tapping in the air (Condition 6).

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Apr 27th, 1:00 PM

Effects of Simple Motor Movement on Physiological Activity

Union Wisconsin Room

Emotion regulation refers to one’s ability to adapt and regulate emotional responses to situational demands. These adaptive and regulatory patterns vary depending on individual and contextual differences. For example, slow finger-tapping reduces physiological arousal produced by stressful stimuli. The present study was conducted to determine whether rhythmic movement of fingers, tactile feedback from tapping, or combination of the two will produce the reduction in stress. Participants begin by completing measures including the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Next, participants are fitted with physiological equipment to measure electrocardiogram (ECG), respiration, and skin conductance levels. A 5-minute resting baseline is recorded, followed by presentation of images intended to induce stress. After the first presentation of images, participants complete the PANAS for a second time and are randomly assigned to one of seven finger-tapping conditions. These include: (1) control - no tapping, (2) steady tapping on a flat surface, (3) steady tapping finger movements in the air, (4) steadily being tapped by a device (5) slow tapping on a flat surface, (6) slow tapping finger movements in the air, and (7) being tapped slowly by a device. Participants then complete a 10-minute training on how to tap in accordance with their assigned condition. Following training, participants view a second set of images (while tapping throughout) followed by a third completion of the PANAS. A final 5-minute physiological baseline is then recorded, followed by debriefing. During the second (post-training) set of images, all steady tapping conditions are expected to produce greater sympathetic activity (indexed by heart rate variability) compared to controls. Compared to steady tapping and controls, greater parasympathetic activity is expected for all slow tapping conditions. Greater parasympathetic activity is expected for participants being tapped slowly by the device (Condition 7) than for participants slowly tapping in the air (Condition 6).